Unified Weird Theory Addenda: Astro-Gnosis Redux



Gnosticism is not easily understood, and was intentionally designed that way.

The point was to drape its extremely radical- and weird- messages in layers of allegory and symbol, some of whose definitions are lost to us today. There were also a bewildering number of different expressions of Gnosticism (a term invented after the movement's heyday in the time before Rome's adoption of Christianity as state religion), from strongly Christian groups to pagan-influenced groups who incorporated magic, alchemy and concepts such as the Ogdoad from ancient religions. 

Gnosticism seems to mean whatever anyone wants it to mean these days. Right-wing Christians from conspiratainment extremists to mushy moderates like the New York Times' Ross Douthat use the term to attack and vilify their opponents within the Church, a rhetorical practice dating back to the earliest "church fathers." Often you see people on the left and right throwing the term Gnostic around willy-nilly to describe (and therefore denigrate) everything from squishy liberalism to Nazism to Maoism and everything in between.

It's not as if there isn't a huge corpus of excellent material on the topic out there. It's easy to get lost in the highways and byways of Gnostic codebreaking and the rich, roiling atmosphere of second-century Alexandria: the most-definitely overlapping magisteriums of the Jews, the Christians, the Mysteries, the Buddhists, the pagans, all more alike and influenced by each other than their survivors today would ever want to admit. But one idea set the Gnostics apart from all the rest...
The fundamental difference that separates the Gnostics from their contemporaries is that, for them, their native `soil' is not the earth, but that lost heaven which they keep vividly alive in their memories: they are the autochthons of another world.

Hence their feeling of having fallen onto our earth like inhabitants from a distant planet, of having strayed into the wrong galaxy, and their longing to regain their true cosmic homeland, the luminous hyper-world that shimmers beyond the great nocturnal barrier.

Their uprooting is not merely geographical but planetary.


And to treat them as aliens in the political or civic sense - which is what happened - could be nothing but an absurd misunderstanding, like giving a Martian a temporary residence visa.

For the Gnostics, all men were in the same condition, although they were the only ones who knew it, and the human community as a whole is implicated in this universal exile, this galactic diversion that has caused us to be dumped on the mud of planet earth.


The Gnostics must have felt this exile even more acutely in that they themselves constituted marginal communities, strangers or ‘foreigners' in the narrow sense of the term, in the heart of a whole humanity of foreigners.

Here there was an historical humus which justified the Gnostic feeling of exile, of being a planetary foreigner: `I am in the world but not of the world' is the most basic Gnostic formula.

So the problem is simple, and one begins to understand how the Gnostics saw it: man, then, is a lifelong exile on a planet which is a prison for all mankind; he lives in a body which is a prison for the soul; he is the autochthon of a lost and invisible world.

The Gnostics
by Jacques La Carriere

Owls and eyes, eh? Ancient Gnostic amulet

Eric Vogelin's work is wildly popular with conservatives looking for cudgels and meat-hammers to bash Gnostics, quasi-Gnostics and not-really-Gnostics with, but even so the great German scholar understood the basic heart beating at the core of the ancient heresy:
Of the profusion of gnostic experiences and symbolic expressions, one feature may be singled out as the central element in this varied and extensive creation of meaning: the experience of the world as an alien place into which man has strayed and from which he must find his way back home to the other world of his origin.

"Who has cast me into the suffering of this world?" asks the "Great Life" of the gnostic texts, which is also the "first, alien Life from the worlds of light."
It is an alien in this world and this world is alien to it. 

Therefore the question, "Who conveyed me into the evil darkness?" and the entreaty, "Deliver us from the darkness of this world into which we are flung." The world is no longer the well-ordered, the cosmos, in which Hellenic man felt at home; nor is it the Judaeo-Christian world that God created and found good. Gnostic man no longer wishes to perceive in admiration the intrinsic order of the cosmos.


Flying "eyes" have been seen for thousands of years

In the ontology of ancient Gnosticism this is accomplished through faith in the "alien," "hidden" God who comes to man's aid, sends him his messengers, and shows him the way out of the prison of the evil God of this world (be he Zeus or Yahweh or one of the other ancient father-gods).

Eric Vogelin, Collected Works: Science, Politics and Gnosticism

And not all modern right-wingers are anti-scholarly when it comes to Gnosticism. Catholic intellectuals often understand its message, they just realize it's bad for business.
To the Gnostics of old … this world is an immense prison guarded by malevolent powers on high, a place of exile where the fallen and forgetful divine spark dwelling deep within the pneumatikos (the “spiritual man”) languishes in ignorance and bondage, passing from life to life in drugged sleep, wrapped in the ethereal garments of the “souls” it acquired in descending through the planetary spheres, and sealed fast within the coarse involucrum of an earthly body.

The spiritual experience at the heart of the Gnostic story of salvation was, as Hans Jonas puts it, the “call of the stranger God”: a call heard inwardly that awakens the spirit from its obliviousness to its own nature, and that summons it home again from this hostile universe and back again to the divine pleroma—the “fullness”—from which it departed in a time before time.  David Bentley Hart, First Things

ARCHONUNAKI

Gotta love that saucer section.
One of the primary Gnostic texts-- a generally accepted Creation narrative-- is Hypostasis of the Archons or "Reality of the Rulers." We've looked at it here before but it describes a situation in which emanations from the Godhead or Monad take form and come to know themselves. But one in particular sees himself as superior to the others and creates a false world in which to imprison lower emanations from the Monad, which decrease in spiritual power the further away from the source they are.

This false-creator is variously known as the Demiurge or Ialdoboath of Samael. Who, uh, came from Outer Space...
Their chief is blind; because of his power and his ignorance and his arrogance he said, with his power, "It is I who am God; there is none apart from me." When he said this, he sinned against the entirety. And this speech got up to incorruptibility; then there was a voice that came forth from incorruptibility, saying, "You are mistaken, Samael" - which is, "god of the blind."

His thoughts became blind. And, having expelled his power - that is, the blasphemy he had spoken - he pursued it down to chaos and the abyss, his mother, at the instigation of Pistis Sophia.

And she established each of his offspring in conformity with its power - after the pattern of the realms that are above, for by starting from the invisible world the visible world was invented.

As incorruptibility looked down into the region of the waters, her image appeared in the waters; and the authorities of the darkness became enamored of her....
The rulers laid plans and said, "Come, let us create a man that will be soil from the earth." They modeled their creature as one wholly of the earth.

This Evangelical diagram clearly shows that the Biblical term "waters"
refers to extrasolar outer space, the "firmament" describing our solar system

Of course, reading the Hypostasis of the Archons, with its heavenly hosts of celestial powers, including one who stands up against all the others and creates the Cosmos in the image of a celestial goddess, and the "waters" and then the creation of man, you can't but be reminded of this text, can you?
That he might divide the monster and do artful works.
He split her like a shellfish into two parts:
Half of her he set up and ceiled as sky,
Pulled down the bar and posted guards.
He bade them to allow not her waters to escape.
He crossed the heavens and surveyed (its) regions.
He squared Apsu's quarter, the abode of Nudimmud,
As the lord measured the dimensions of Apsu.
The Great Abode, its likeness, he fixed as Esharra,
The Great Abode, Esharra, which he made as the firmament.
Anu, Enlil, and Ea he made occupy their places. When Marduk hears the words of the gods,
His heart prompts (him) to fashion artful works.
Opening his mouth he addresses EA
To impart the plan he addresses EA
To impart the plan he had conceived in his heart:
"Blood I will mass and cause boned to be.
I will establish a savage, 'man' shall be his name.
Verily, savage man I will create.
He shall be charged with the service of the gods
That they might be at ease! The ways of the gods I will artfully alter.
Though alike revered, into two (groups) they shall be divided."
So it's clear beyond any possible argument that Gnosticism preached a message of alienation, of belonging to another world. Of being higher beings imprisoned in meatsuits.

The question is how literally do we dare take this? Do we keep all this lost in the misty miasma of mysticism, or do we cross-reference with other texts (oh, like, you know, THIS) and a modern understanding of the cosmos and our own history- and cough, cough, DNA-  and see what comes of all that?

41 comments:

  1. It doesn't really matter whether we take this literally or not, it still points to a spiritual quest. Our task is to escape from this prison and we won't do it by obsessing about the details of the prison with our intellect. It is precisely because people are so intellectually enamoured of this world that they cannot escape it. If you want to understand why the intellect and logic are a persons worst enemy with regards to escaping, read my post "Why Zen Buddhism Abhors Logic" at againstalllogic . wordpress . com Sorry about the link, hopefully it will avoid your spam folder.

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  2. I'm a bit at a loss with this gnostic business. I mean, I have always felt alienated, so naturally there are elements of Gnosticism that are very appealing. Also, it is pretty clear that the god of Abraham is a criminally insane psychopath. My conflict with this idea of us humans being somehow separate from nature stems from direct experiences of oneness that I have had at various times. After Madre Ayahuasca tells you she is your mother, and in fact the mother of us all. Also, having experienced transcendent oneness and intense unconditional love, it becomes a bit difficult for me to reconcile the gnostic idea that we are trapped in a prison. Perhaps all of this is metaphorical, and the "prison" the Gnostics speak of is our own limited awareness. I'm not sure.

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  3. As someone who rediscovered Gnosticism via this very blog, I want to thank you again Chris for presenting it in such an easy to understand fashion. I had first learned about it in college, where I found it all very fascinating. I also studied Buddhism, which has a lot of similarities ("all life is suffering" is a prime tenant of Buddhism, along with the notion of escaping the cycle of life, death, and rebirth). Back then though I never really made all the connections and I was also quite materialistic and reductionist (before it was cool, lol) so I was looking for faults in all belief system, rather than noticing how they all converged. I did, however, come up with the notion that all religions were from a single source, but back then had no idea what that might be. I think maybe the Gnostics DID know.

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  4. What ta do with a chris...what what what...

    He needs to write screenplays / treatments for da vinci's demons and make a boat load of money....

    Then put all of his blog postings in one big fat download on dropbox so we can spend hours into the nights pondering his musings.

    Yep, thats what i would do.... If i were Christopher.


    Be well

    Laurence

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  5. juan, didn't she tell you that ye and she are one? reading the end of this meritorious (and meritworthy) post and thinking laterally, the dna at the heart of all living things is the most likely candidate for being our gnostic passenger...he rides, and he rides and he rides. we are all vastly more than we suspect, I suspect ;-)

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    1. Nope, it was very much an I-thou type of exchange.

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  6. The Gnostic myth as the Enuma Elish (Babylonian Marduk myth) are SOLAR mythologies, and are against the more ancient Lunar mythos of the Great Mother.

    Even before the Gnostics were the Orphic Mysteries. Orphism was a philosophical school of thinking which kinda emerged in the Dionysian Mysteries and then took them over, diluted the sacraments and created a dogma which said the body was a tomb, and was made by the ashes of the Titans, and entrapped in each person was the spark of Dionysos which via their purification rituals--which could take lifetimes--eventually this divine spark could find release and return to its spiritual home above away from Earth. So this is same theme.
    Some say that the Orphic Mysteries for their ideas from contact with Indian mysticism which also had it that reality was an illusion/Maya and the yogis sought release to an eternal blissful place, finally escaping the having to be reborn on Earth, and be part of the cycle of birth and death.
    As any good feminist will tell you, this is all part of patriarchal thinking! The desire by patriarchal mindsets to escape the mother, and nature. Now we have it in its modern guise as wanting to get onto spaceships and git the hell outta here.
    But in the more ancient lunar mythos, where the Moon is the luminary which synchronistically is felt to be the metaphor for the movements of reality, including the inner life, and death, and spiritual rebirth--because of its dynamic play of life and dark in a complimentary cyclic way (IE light and dark are NOT in conflict)---Earth, nature is not *divided* from the universe! It is only in patriarchal thinking there comes the concept of the 'muddy swamp prison 'down here'' and the 'pure realms up there'.
    So I suppose the question sis WHY and HOW did this divisive mindset arise in the first place? I think it is thinking. It is when 'thinking' identifies with itself and then objectifies. It divides itself from what 'it' observes', loses feeling/soul, and assumes superiority, but is in denial what has happened, because it will 'rationalize'. Psychedelics are THE sacred medicine par excellence to heal this dis-ease, but the indoctrination can be very strong that what happens is, when taken in the context of a set and setting which pre-sumes such a divisive belief, then this can influence the experience. We know this can happen in NDEs etc when the belief systems affects what can be experienced.
    A good example of this I come across quite a bit on psychedelic forums, is how even people who have experienced psychedelics will DEMAND the experience be reduced to a 'chemical ride' or just 'getting fucked up', and will support scientific materialism to the death. From my perspective they just don't get it, because they are indoctrinated in the cult of scientism.

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    1. Thank you. This was just the reminder I needed:)

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  7. I am always amazed with the profundity that Chris evokes. I am likewise amazed at the comments. So here we are all speculating on what comes next, after death. Truth will out, methinks. What an exciting adventure. Shineforth brave souls. Dennis

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  8. Not directly related to the topic at hand, but decidedly "gnostish" filmmaker Alex Proyas is working on a movie about the Gods Of Egypt and Game of Thrones actor Nicolaj Coster-Waldau is in talks to star as Horus. The storyline is essentially a bastardization of Egyptian myths along the line of how IMMORTALS and CLASH OF THE TITANS ran roughshod over the Greek versions, but Proyas' leading the project is interesting. Especially as Aronofsky, another filmmaker in that vein, is tackling Noah as a post-apocalyptic tale.

    http://www.cinemablend.com/new/Game-Thrones-Nikolaj-Coster-Waldau-Lead-Alex-Proyas-Gods-Egypt-37901.html

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  9. Always excellent stuff from Christopher Loring Knowles!
    Suggestion for a good reading http://montalk.net/gnosis

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  10. Always excellent stuff from Christopher Loring Knowles!
    Suggestion for a good reading http://montalk.net/gnosis

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  11. It think wherever our dharma (mission) takes us, that’s our home.

    Isn’t Gnosticism about finding the Kingdom Within?

    Home is wherever the sacred heart is!

    <3

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  12. Against- We are spirits in the material world but we are also material in it as well. Spiritual quest is one of those terms that is so elastic it can end up meaning nothing at all. I like the definition of spirit as the catalyst to meaningful action; "that's the spirit!" This blog has always been and always will be about people who kick at the boundaries and make shit happen. Who use weirdness to move the mountain.

    Juan- Well, the Gnostics are basically saying that there is a "Fullness," the Pleroma, which is the Source of all Being. But why limit it to Earth? Remote viewers used to poke around on Mars and the Moon, which shows that at the very, very least our imaginations are not tethered here. There is a universe out there and we are rapidly devolving because we've run out of meaningful activity to pursue with our non-adaptive brains. And let me be clear here- I am really, really opposed to "Oneness" talk. I am into Lotsness. Like pointing a telescope at some tiny corner of the sky and seeing billions of galaxies disappear into the cosmic horizon. The Gnostics teach there is Oneness but it's so remote and so out of our experience it's not worth worrying about.

    Gus- A lot of scholars see a lot of Buddhism in Gnosticism. Our old friends the Phoenicians- who at the time in question were called the Syrians- might be the source of this originally since they travelled the entire globe. But at the same time there's pretty clear evidence that Indian missionaries were in Alexandria and other cities. I was heavily into Buddhism as well but there was something that was being denied me, something missing. Or maybe that's just the essentially secular Americans who were controlling it back in the 80s, I don't know. But I still think about it all the time.

    Laurence- It's a struggle to sit up half the time (which I have to do sometimes for 100 hours a week for work) so be patient with me. I got big plans, Joe, big plans.

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  13. Muzu- What does that mean- Solar myth? I don't think Solar mythology as seen by the Solar cults throughout history has anything to do with the Sun in the sky- I think I've explored that in depth over the past several years. And if the professors argue scoff, well, we all have our crosses to bear. I did link to which particular Sun the Mithraic/Sol Invictus crowd said themselves that they worshipped and if you think that has something to do with the flaming ball of helium 93 million miles away than we really have nothing to talk about.

    Dennis- Thank you very kindly.

    John- Ah yes. I wonder if Proyas reads this blog. I trust him more than I do those Titans and Immortals guys- those movies were...ugh. I couldn't make it through 15 minutes of Immortals and you're talking to a guy who has the serious hots for Freida Pinto.

    Pictus- Thank you- bookmarked!

    Jasun- Maybe the KIngdom means something in the DNA. Maybe it means something in our brain chemistry. If it means what it's been used as an excuse for for 20 centuries- navel-gazing solipsism- then I'll pass, thank you.

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  14. Chris, thanks for the reply. Yeah, I had pretty much the same impression of Buddhism in the US (or my little corner of it in academia) back in the late 80's, early 90's. Of course, I was learning about it in college, from a prof who claimed he was a Buddhist. In any case, I found it far more promising than the Abrahamic religions, for my own spiritual needs at the time.

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  15. Among a few of the more spiritually active "New Age" adherents, there can be a resistance to hard physical science and a perverse readiness to accept wildly unsupported claims from anti-gravity engines to free fusion energy. Conversely among the rigidly science minded there can be an even more militant attitude refusing to concede that certain elements of deep physical science and cosmology resonate with spiritual and philosophical ideas.

    Personally, I'm more in the vein of Pk Dick who during a discussion with his friend, fellow writer and devout Catholic Tim Powers, he described his (Dick's) religious ideas - mixing multiple sources from ancient Christianity to psychedelic drugs and Quantum physics. At some point deep in this conversation, Powers criticized Dick for making "religion sound like science fiction." Dick responded, "well, if religion is true, then isn't that exactly what we're talking about?"

    Lately, I'm a bit fascinated by CERN, the LHC and what it is discovering about that wild and most reliable of obtuse physical theories - the Standard Model of Particle Physics. If you really look at the Standard Model, it is kind of crazy. Essentially, you have the fundamental particles that are simply "empty packets of potential" - bits of nothingness - that are held together (or apart) by "virtual particles" or guage bosons. Now, what is the guage that mediates the electromagnetic force? It's a "virtual photon" - what we like to call light. So, what does that mean, exactly? Essentially, the electromagnetic force is what holds electrons to the nucleus of an atom and what holds atoms together in molecules. As you can imagine, it is essentially the force that creates most of our everyday material reality along with gravity - a still nearly completely mysterious enigma element of our physical universe.

    Now, the most interesting thing, of course, is why is this light "virtual"? What that means is that the photons only exists for such a short amount of time that they can't really be said to have existed at all. We're in "Planck" space and time, here. But every elementary particle that interacts electromagnetically - electrons and protons (which are really quarks) - are constantly generating this field of virtual light like strands reaching out to find other particles and interact with them. That's how an electron "knows" a proton or another electron is nearby.

    But if you really look at the process, you could also say that it appears this light is actually coming from and returning to a "different" universe.

    And, if you go into it even further, the current theory shows that most of the universe is actually not made up of matter with which we can interact. Dark Energy and Dark Matter is not called that because it is black, but because it is invisible and intangible as it does not interact with the electromagnetic force. That is the force that produces EM rays (light) that can be seen and prevents objects from passing through each other.

    However, it is extremely massive, however, and this means we can see its gravitational effects on a cosmic scale - and these effects are strong enough to shape galaxies.

    So, if you start talking about other realities, these are not entirely outside the realm of the physical world at all.

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  16. Muzu- What does that mean- Solar myth? I don't think Solar mythology as seen by the Solar cults throughout history has anything to do with the Sun in the sky- .." ohhh noooo why would they care about this massive blazing planet that rises and sets in the sky....(hmmmm)

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  17. If that's the sun you think they they are talking about then you obviously have not read the literature.

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  18. The Solar Era:
    The Separation from Nature and
    The Battle between Good and Evil:
    In the story of the development of Western civilization, from around 2000 BC, we begin to see the beginning of a new phase in the evolution of human consciousness and a change of focus from a lunar to a solar mythology. This era, which has been equated with the rise of civilization, actually reflects a complete eclipse of the participatory experience of the lunar era, taking over many of the older lunar myths and stories and setting them in a new solar context. The dominant celestial body is now the sun rather than the moon and the dominant mythology is solar rather than lunar. The primary theme of lunar mythology is a cyclical process of birth, death and regeneration. The theme of solar mythology is a great battle between Light and Darkness, Good and Evil. Whereas the focus of lunar culture is on an ensouled cosmos and mythic participation in the life of a Sacred Order, the focus of solar culture is on the conquest and mastery of nature, the development of the rational mind, and the differentiation of the outstanding individual from the tribal group. It is, above all, the age of the individual and, specifically, the warrior who dons the mantle of the solar hero."

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    1. Very insightful. I enjoy the link you provided. :)

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  19. Interesting in that point, in both Japanese and Germanic mythology, the sun is female and the moon is male, and they are sister and brother.

    Sol, Sunna, Sunne are the Germanic/Old English names of this goddess and, obviously, where we get our terms The Sun and Solar.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%B3l_(sun)

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  20. Hey Chris,

    Interesting stuff as always. You know, for me personally the sun is a vary multi-layered symbol, but I am in full agreement with you that the sun of the Mithraic groups is not the actual literal sun -- although I believe the actual literal sun is spooky as fuck.

    While I've kind of used the image of the Midnight Sun to represent Innermost Light, divine totality and whatnot in my own work -- I think first and foremost the Mithraic Sun is a 'holy chariot' of a UFO cargo cult, as your work outlines in great detail. But within that we have references to the occupants, the gods, the shining ones -- for all intents and purposes the physical manifestations of this more metaphysical sun; this Innermost Light.

    Kinda reminds of the Provenance / Providence eps from TXF, where Agent Comer talks about Josepho believing that the buried alien craft 'houses the physical manifestation of God'. Something very weird is going on with this symbolism -- a kind of metaphorical-literal-metaphorical echo chamber -- where to dismiss the physical or the figurative is missing half the equation, as it were. I'm also reminded of the biblical legends regarding the Ark of the Covenant.

    But to tease apart what is 'literal' and what is 'metaphorical' in these concepts, and the larger concepts of Gnosticism; that's extremely difficult. I would say this though; the kind of interest that the elites and power-brokers have taken in all these aspects of Weird is highly suggestive of it all being something far more than just a bunch of nebulous fantasies and allegories. There are things that the higher ups believe or suspect know or that we don't. For the most part. But all this stuff runs through the very core of the human and possibly non-human experience.

    Peace

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  21. I get the impression from many Gnostics (and their funhouse mirrors in Orthodoxy, the Reformed church) that not /every human being/ would count as being foreign. To many - especially some of the pre-churchiness, radical Gnostics - most human beings, like animals, are unenlightened mud people who can not be saved. Whatever kindness you might show to them it's no more than being friendly to a cat, they are no subjects capable of Gnosis.

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  22. I dunno, my cat is more aware than most humans. Somehow she knows when I'm going to be late, and comes in the room and meows at me.

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  23. " Horapollo Aesymnetes said,...
    I get the impression from many Gnostics (and their funhouse mirrors in Orthodoxy, the Reformed church) that not /every human being/ would count as being foreign. To many - especially some of the pre-churchiness, radical Gnostics - most human beings, like animals, are unenlightened mud people who can not be saved. Whatever kindness you might show to them it's no more than being friendly to a cat, they are no subjects capable of Gnosis."

    I think that charge can be leveled pretty squarely at the New Age movement as the vast majority of it seems to be very "self-focused" and emergent from self-help projects that primarily place one's own personal evolution - however defined - as the primary objective negating any other concerns.

    However, I tend to believe that the early Gnostics or primarily the very early Christian and pre-Christian antecedents saw the world quite differently.

    I'm reminded of the time I visited a ranch that rescued wild mustangs. I spoke to the rancher about how I had grown up around race horses in Kentucky and these wild horses seemed much different. She said, of course they are. If you keep a horse locked in a stall most of its youth except only the times when you let it out to run in a big circle, it's no surprise the animals become the most brainless beasts imaginable.

    So, I think that was the early gnostic ethic, actually. They experienced the emancipation from spiritual bondage and therefore whenever they looked at a person, they could see the "free spirit" within, no matter how bound by the material they actually were.

    Therefore, the mission, the divine work, of releasing others from that bondage would have been an inescapable moral imperative for the true gnostic as they would be the only ones who understood truly how valuable each soul was.

    The eyes are the window to the soul, and the soul is the portal to the divine.

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  24. I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on Grant Morrison's version of the Gnostic paradigm. In his recounting of his own "abduction" experience, he describes being told by his extradimensional visitors that humankind is the larval or fetal stage of a type of being whose natural home is a higher dimension of reality. Spacetime is therefore a kind of womb or egg or cocoon in which we are maturing before taking our place in the vast World Beyond. In this view, the sickness and horror which you describe as the hostility of the biosphere is analogous to the chemical changes in the womb signaling that birth is imminent: increased acidity, decreased oxygen, etc.

    I bring this up because it seems like an interesting synthesis of the "solar" and "lunar" narratives muzuzu is talking about: this world WAS our rightful home once, but we have reached the stage in our development where we must either exit or sicken and die (the infections resulting from a failure to leave the womb would of course likely kill our "mother" as well). In this view matter is not inherently inimical to our existence; it is simply a phase which we have outgrown.

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  25. Grant Morrison: "So, I went out and I read Robert Anton Wilson's books when I was 20 years old, which is 20 years agonow, and I figure, is this guy bullshitting me? He says we can talk to aliens, we can talk to people fromSirius, is he talking crap? He said Aleister Crowley's got methods for contacting alien intelligences andfor changing the world, is he talking crap? So I did it and, no, he's not talking crap!" This guy to me seems to be Luciferian--either consciously or subconsciously. I am guessing, though I don't know for sure--that if you asked him what his thoughts were about an occult elite being behind 9/11 attacks he would, like the guy RAW he admires, laugh it off. ..I urge people to read the book, I will link to at end of this post, because it very much exposes the tricks they play, How they infiltrate the consciousness via the so-called New Age religion with intent to control it, and the main message is that they contact invisible entities who tell them stuff that is reactionary, and always talk about leaving planet Earth. They are part of a patriarchal mindset that wants to either put-nature-right and/or vacate it. Mother Earth is not WAS our rightful home *once*, it is our home *now*, AND is home to many other species' some of which were here long before 'us' (not meaning we landed here as aliens by the way. Another Luciferian/New Age myth)--as in the plants and trees can live with us, but we cannot live without plants and trees. AND is home for the countless generations to come. IF we get sucked into their myths it means we become apathetic and will not challenge the cabal that is doing the mindcontrol and inciting ecocide. The most radical and crucial thing we can do is become aware of the mindcontrol/matrix whilst simultaneoulsly partaking of psychedelics to heal our rift between ourselves and nature, and our bodies, and feelings and others. http://www.amazon.com/Return-Mother-Armageddon-Towards-Feminist/dp/1891386077



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  26. meant to type" the plants and trees can live without us, but we cannot live without the plants and trees"

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  27. Wrong, Muz. With the right technology we can get rid of these hideous plants and the meatsack moron humans. I am all for that, if the future is nothing but this endless repetition of worthless zeros (aka Humans) I pray for an asteroid.

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  28. Muzuzus: It's interesting that you use the word "reactionary" to describe a narrative centered around evolution and growth. To me, reactionary means looking backward, yearning for an idealized past and rejecting the complexities of the modern world--which sounds an awful lot like Monica Sjoo and her message of returning to an ancient matriarchal culture. I find it highly unlikely that the old "lunar" religions she describes really functioned in the way that she imagines. History and humanity are rarely simple enough to be summed up in binary distinctions like "lunar" vs "solar", or "patriarchal" vs "feminist".

    Morrison's narrative is simply carrying the "Earth = Mother" metaphor to its logical conclusion: every child must leave the womb eventually. That's not a patriarchal imposition, it's a medical fact. I'm not saying I buy into his theory--I haven't experienced any kind of gnostic revelation, so this discussion remains mostly theoretical for me--but I think it's an interesting perspective on our place in the cosmos and the destiny of the species. Nothing can exist in homeostatic equilibrium forever; even if we stay wrapped in the Earth Mother's loving embrace and never seek the stars, the sun will eventually burn out and leave us to freeze in the vacuum. Ever consider that the eternal light/dark circle might be more like an upward spiral?

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  29. Hi Joe, before I attempt a reply, can I ask you if you have read the book I mentioned by Monica Sjoo?

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  30. Fair question. I haven't read the book, although I did check out the amazon page you linked to in order to try to get a sense of the book's thesis. I think I've heard variations on the theme before from various places within the occult/paranormal/parapolitical blogosphere. Let me try to sum up the basic ideas and you can tell me if I'm coming close or way off base:

    1. Prior to the rise of agricultural civilization, humans worshiped the power and mystery of nature, often represented by goddesses and lunar symbolism. Worship was often conducted at night or in caves, aided by psychedelics and ritual frenzies aimed at transcending ordinary consciousness and inducing an experience of oneness with nature and the universe. Divinity was viewed as immanent in the universe, and the gods dwelled on earth with men and women.

    2. In the cosmology of these religions, there was no notion of inevitable progress or linear time; time was viewed in terms of diurnal, seasonal, and mythic cycles which repeated eternally, as represented by the waxing and waning of the moon. Birth and death were seen as part of an endless rhythm.

    3. With the rise of agriculture, centralized civilization, and large-scale warfare, came a shift in religious thought. The sun was now used as the primary symbol of divinity, the gods lived high in heaven and were viewed as kings and conquerors. The notion of an immortal soul distinct from the flesh took hold.

    4. This division between heaven and earth produced a shift in human value systems: rational thought was now valued over intuition, men were valued higher than women, the earth was something to be mastered and controlled rather than something to be worshiped. Laws and doctrines replaced experiential contact with divinity. History was viewed as a linear progression in which a final violent conflict at the end of time would destroy the earth.

    5. This value system is ultimately responsible for the exploitation of nature by modern capitalist culture; since mind is valued over body and heaven over earth, there is no reason to regard natural systems or non-human creatures as having intrinsic value outside of their worth on the open market. Since the world is ending soon anyway, there is no reason to try to preserve it.

    6. New age theories that offer hope for an imminent transformation of mankind facilitated by extraterrestrial beings (or the achievement of immortality through the merging of human consciousness with technology) are merely outgrowths of this same solar mythos. The promised rescue by star-beings serves as an excuse for not acting to save the ecosystem. These beliefs may be deliberately promoted by intelligence agencies and others with a vested interest in capitalist commodity culture for this very reason.

    7. If we have any hope of surviving as a species, we must return to the view of nature and the earth as inherently sacred and valuable. Rather than wishing for a holy Armageddon or a transhuman apotheosis, we should align ourselves once more with the patterns and rhythms of the natural world and seek communion with the web of living beings in which we are embedded. Use of psychedelics and nature-oriented spiritual practices can facilitate this shift in cultural consciousness.

    Is that more or less the narrative that Sjoo is presenting? If not, then I've misunderstood what you've been trying to say in these comments. Please note that I'm not trying to be dismissive; I actually think a lot of these ideas are worth considering.

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  31. That is a good summary. Though I personally am not 'looking backward' nor is Monica Sjoo, because time is understood to be nonlinear. IE have you had psychedelic experience? If you have and you observe the 'spectacle' if you will--the mad rushing about world, I see a mindset caught up in its image of linear sense of time. Of people glued to their little hand held computers, and getting from A to B--bit like robots. There seems to be that sense of 'moderns' looking at indigenous peoples as 'backward'. But let me ask YOU. I am guessing from what you say that you have a vision of 'leaving the 'womb planet'--something I remember Leary saying a lot in his book Exopychology. So OK---close you eyes (play with me lol). Now--where you gonna go?...Also, the metaphor for Womb. in the mythos of the great Mother was not just planet Earth, but including the heavens also. It is a Womb we are born from, and preserved in, and return to, etc.

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  32. Just to clarify, the last comment was, in fact, me. Someone else was signed into their gmail on the computer I was using.

    As for where we'd leave to: I don't know yet. But I'm interested in imagining the possibilities.

    I get the impression that when Chris talks about our home being "elsewhere" he doesn't necessarily mean another physical planet in this physical universe. It seems to me that he means another mode of being entirely, one that perhaps transcends physicality altogether. Or, viewed through Morrison's narrative, a mode of being that incorporates additional dimensions beyond the three spatial and one temporal axis to which we are accustomed.

    In this latter case, it might not mean leaving our physical bodies at all, but merely viewing them from an expanded perspective that vastly increases the scope of our perception and our range of possible actions--freedom to move and be and do on a level previously unimaginable. Interestingly enough, this would mean transcending the illusion of linear time--so perhaps you and I are not talking about different things after all. Maybe we're just using different metaphors to describe the same shift in consciousness. Kind of a head-bender to imagine a linear historical progression leading inevitably to the realization that time is non-linear, isn't it? But fun to try and wrap your brain around.

    It's worth remembering that "apocalypse" really means "revelation". Perhaps the "end of time" refers to the collective realization that we were home all along, and our exile was an illusion. The New Jerusalem and the Garden of Eden are revealed to be one and the same. Maybe that is the blindness of the God of the Blind: the suppression of the higher-dimensional sensory faculties that normally allow us to perceive all of spacetime as a unified whole.

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  33. Well when I first had psychedelic experience nature was transformed and was like the 'garden of Eden--if you like, though I hate the patriarchal subversion of what such a 'Garden' deeply means of course. Notice in that tale the 'God' makes out that the disobedience brought death into paradise. That is a trick or psy op which makes the reader think that death and life MUST be separate, right. For if the God is claiming there was only immorality, and blames Eve for adding mortality, then.....See the mindfuck? After my first trip session which happened in my 15th year, I then went on a spiritual search for integration. Went through alot of books, but only Alan Watts' (Cloudhidden Whereabouts Unknown) book --which I discovered--seemed to be what I needed. he talked about the polarity of reality. You cant have life without death, dark without light. many years later when I found out about Goddess mythology, I see it is central to that understanding too, and also that nature is sacred When you talk about TIME, it is interesting to know that one of the mythical beginnings of tyhe patriarchy as recorded in text is the Babylonian epic the Enuma Elish where marduk the solar god-king attacks Taimat, the Great Goddess, and then pushes his version of time onto the universe---ie., setting himself up as the Master of Time. And this is what this is what continues. In Egypt it was Thoth who was the Master of Tome, and according to the author of The Most Dangerous Book in the Wolrd: 9/11 as mass Ritual, the occult elite very much feature Egyptical gods, especially Thoth who is also known as a god of magic, into their symbolism, and numerology. So it seems that of some importance to the control-freaks is their control of the perception of time. Tome now is made completely mechanical divided into minutes, seconds, and even microseconds etc. Our lives are regulated. When we take psychedelics --in my experience--suddenly you are liberated from that mechanical sense of time. I am not anti the idea of UFOs and beings, but am against the mindset that pushes so-called progress, because it seems to go with utter disrespect for other species we share planet Earth with, other peoples, us, and it is very very *very* ugly indeed.

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  34. At the risk of sounding predictable, I have to say that the image below the title looks a lot like the angel is pointing at/through a Stargate, or perhaps a time tunnel. OK, I'll say it - a Boom Tube?

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