Sunday, December 21, 2014

Would You Care to Trance?


Neurologists do a lot of work studying the brain and the effects of aging and maturity on its function. They don't tend to do much work in the way of consciousness, since the Archonic paradigm that dominates academia and the sciences doesn't allow for the existence of such a thing.

So what I mean to say is that if you feel that the world has become cold, gray, dead, inert, hopeless and meaningless you're not imagining anything at all; the Archontic philosophy that arose in the 18th Century has annihilated all meaningful resistance to its dominance so even the opposition to the ruling class is entirely Archontic; materialist, reductionist, mechanical, dialectic, dead, empty, anti-human.

We live in this William Gibson Reality, only without any of the cool bits. The attack on Sony Pictures was straight out of a Gibson novel (even the hackers' name) and yet another signal that the digital cuttlefish that controls information has a soft white underbelly that can be exploited to deleterious effect (the Cloud hack was an earlier shot across the bow), and the danger only grows.

The Transhumanist movement and the Singulatarian movement have most certainly run out of gas in the past few years, with Singularity prophet Ray Kurzweil getting a day job at Google, but the promise of a mechanistic Nirvana lives on in their hearts. I don't know how much currency it has in the greater culture; it seems that digital trivia and binge drinking (eg.,distraction and oblivion) seem to be the preferred methods of deliverance for the Millennials.

The ubiquity of digital media has made Archontic reality a literal Borgsong, an inescapable static that is rewiring our brains every day (and our DNA, according to some scientists) preparing us for the Skynet Apocalypse that seems nearly inevitable. But at the same time I sense a growing discontent, a silent, simmering dissent that can't even identify itself, its gripes, its goals.

But if you know the psychology of repression, you know that makes it all the more potentially explosive. The Archonic media gives constant voice to their preapproved pseudo-dissenters, not a single one of who challenges the materialist status quo, but human souls are starving and wounded and henceforth unpredictably dangerous.






As Timothy Leary once said we can't understand an interior process until we have an external model. The Archons and their simpering toadies (make no mistake, all of them live in a state of perpetual misery and self-loathing) recoil at the truth of this but the fact is that our Skynet is just an inferior simulacrum of our interior supercomputers and the nonlocal superconsciousness that makes up the Collective Conscious/Unconscious.

This isn't a "belief"on my part, it's a conviction.

Archontic pseudo-reality is all about turning off this signal, using the tired tools of ridicule and pseudo-skepticism. And as it stands, consumer culture keeps people tranquilized enough not to care. But no student of history-- or science-- expects any status quo to remain in place forever.

All drugs-- chemical or digital-- run the risk of tolerance and inefficacy, and we're just one medium-strength solar flare away from the whole system going down for good.

I know entheogens are being talked up again, and I'm encouraged by the serious work being done with them, but I've been working with hypnogogic trance for a number of years now (which I briefly mention in this post) and I'm getting to the point where it's as powerful as any hallucinogen, but seems to more reliably tap into what I can only refer to nonlocal consciousness. 

I can only describe it as a kind of remote viewing in that I'll drift along in that fuzzy stream of semi-consciousness and then find myself in the middle of the ocean or on top of a skyscraper in a stark moment of clarity.

In another time people might have called these moments "astral travel," in that I very often visualize-- with great clarity-- places I've never been or seen before. Whether or not these visions are "real" in an objective sense is immaterial, the point is the experience itself and the effect it has on bridging the conscious and unconscious spheres.


It's not always entirely pleasant in a soft, floaty kind of way, but it's always profound. And it's kicked loose a roadblock on my creative impulses that I've struggled against for several years now, so I can't help but wonder if these moments of shock are helping to rewire my unconscious mind in a way that it has become more accessible to my conscious flow, which is really what hypnogogic trance is all about.

So this form of meditation isn't just for kicks: it's about positive change. I feel like I've turned back the clock on certain sectors of my own neurology, and that's vitally important for someone in my line of work.

How do you do it? It's almost laughably simple, but it requires a lot of experimentation on your part. What you need to do is sustain a state where you are semi-awake, able to access both your conscious and unconscious thoughtstreams. Similar to that state you experience after you've awoken from an afternoon nap.

I use a bunch of pillows to position myself so that I'm comfortable but in no danger of actually falling asleep. I recommend trance/ambient music (SomaFM's Drone Zone is excellent) and any kind of supplements that may relax you (Theanine, Valerian Root, St John's Wort) or maybe a glass of warm milk or tea. Again, you want to be relaxed but you don't want to fall asleep. It's simple but not easy, if you get my meaning.

My single-most played track ever, and
 a very powerful invocation for trance work

The encouraging thing about the process is that in my experience it is accumulative, in that your prior results accumulate and contribute to future results. It's a practice, in other words, not like a drug. It's not really meditation because the point isn't to quiet the mind, the point is to turn up the power of the mind as far as you can handle.

But you're doing something unique in that you're trying to unify the conscious and unconscious, sort of like a computer tapping into a network. It's psychedelic as hell, far more chaotic and nonlinear than dreaming (which is why I scoff at the theories of UFO abduction reports being the result of hypnogogia), and produces the occasional auditory hallucination (bells and tones, usually, but sometimes voices as well). It's gotten so I keep a notepad on my bedstand since interesting little phrases and riddles frequently pop up during the flow.

And it's my experience that there's another network available beyond your own conscious mind, though I'd really have to sit down and catalog the reasons why. I'd rather you experience this for yourself. If you're a willing psychonaut, get ready for a lot of work but also major dividends in the future.

SECRET SUN READING LIST