Ask Who's Knocking Before You Let Them In


Because my work requires long hours of sitting alone performing repetitive tasks, I have a constant appetite for distraction. Lately, I've been diving into podcasts on fringe topics I might have previously ignored, not necessarily as research, but as entertainment to pass those long hours. 

It can be interesting to explore modes of thinking you may not agree with or even relate to, because you can often learn about deeper currents at work in the nooks and crannies of the Collective Unconscious.

Yesterday, I was checking out some podcasts on the phenomenon/mythos known as "Black Eyed Children." My normality bias would generally have me file the BEKs in with Slenderman and other post-prosperity icons of the New American Nightmare, so I was surprised to hear there's been some extensive research on the alleged phenomenon. 

I also found one of the defining characteristics of the phenomenon compelling; that these strange children-- who some theorize are human/alien hybrids, others identify as interdimensional demons-- usually show up knocking at your door and asking to come inside. As with the old vampire stories they need permission to enter your home. The lore goes a bit soft when dealing with stories of kids who are invited in, but apparently nothing good comes of it.

I haven't done enough research on the BEKs to decide whether I believe it's simple urban legend or genuine paranormal phenomena (the kind that people scoff at until it happens to them) but I was reminded of my late night encounter with a numinous intruder back in 2010. 

Actually, not my own so much as a very similar encounter a man in England had back in the late 70s, an event I read about in a Jenny Randles book I bought sometime after my own face-off with the weird (I discussed all this on Mike Clelland's podcast back in 2011). Whereas the strangeness of the encounter instilled an abundance of caution on my part, it inspired curiosity in the poor Englishman. Unfortunately, he would soon show symptoms of radiation poisoning following his entity encounter, symptoms that led to a fatal bout of cancer not long after.

I was thinking about all this while having some email discussions with a podcast host who many of you might be familiar with. We were discussing possible topics for a rising of the Secret Sun on his show and the topic of The Nine came up. 

I knew that I'd be asked who and what I believed The Nine actually were and given some of the research I've been doing into psychedelic research, the ancient Mysteries and related topics, I've come to believe that The Nine are some kind of otherdimensional entities that the Round Table group encountered during their balls-trippin', mind-bending "seances" back in the early 50s. That in fact these beings appeared to an earlier group of occultists connected to the whole Jack Parsons/Marjorie Cameron* circle in California.

What's that Kenneth Grant line? "Jack Parsons opened a door and something flew in?" That was very probably The Nine.

What did The Nine bring to those who answered when they came knocking? In the case of Andrija Puharich and Dick Price, not much good. In other cases the results are more uncertain. But the usual explanations about the Nine- usually that of the psyop variety-- really don't stand up to serious scrutiny when you look at the secretiveness, elitism and devotion attached to this group. 

The hoax explanation doesn't really wash, given its longevity. A serious look at this group seems to reveal that The Nine had a grip on some fairly influential people, for reasons that are at best obscure.

Certainly The Nine's profile is pretty low (to say the least) these days, but it could well be that they've simply gone back underground, as they were for 25 years following the Round Table workings. It may well be that these entities have a much different concept of time than we do.

All of this supposition about the nature of The Nine resurfaced following a recent rewatch of DMT: The Spirit Molecule and some reading on Strassman's DMT trials. To be honest, I was a bit alarmed with this rewatch, being more familiar not only with the ancient Mystery traditions the talking heads in the film are constantly stumbling over (every goal of DMT research laid out in the film was already codified in the Mystery traditions) but also more keenly aware of the consequences of the negative aspects of the trials that the film so irresponsibly papers over.

Strassman ended the trials in part because he felt he was opening doors that were better left closed. Here we see the flaw in New Age optimism, that every "higher power" or otherdimensional creature is going to have your best interests at heart. Strassman's own research conclusively proved that was not so. 

Increasingly, his subjects began to encounter malignant beings, some described as "alien insects" and experience bad trips. Strassman:
Parts of twenty-five people's sessions landed in this "bin." (adverse reactions). These adverse effects ranged from being subtle, minor, and extremely brief to those that were terrifying, dangerous, and lingering. Twenty-five out of sixty volunteers seemed like a lot. At the time, I never sensed that nearly half of our volunteers were having problems. Was I minimizing difficulties in my desire to forge ahead in the research under any and all conditions? 
The fact remains that the spirit molecule does not always lead us to love and light. It can open our eyes to terrifying realities, too, and mark us with those experiences for as long as do any beatific ones. DMT is a potentially dangerous drug. For that reason, we must think long and hard about using it in ourselves and on one another.
The documentary-- essentially a propaganda recruitment film for the drug-- seriously fails the viewer in preparing them for the negative potentials of the experience in favor of a string of New Age happytalk. In my view, this fails not only the viewer but the drug, since it's basically repeating the same mistakes of over-promising and under-cautioning made by Timothy Leary et al in the 1960s. 

And we all know how that turned out.

For myself, I avoided DMT after some friends had profoundly negative experiences with it back in the 80s. One of these was very badly shaken by her encounter, so much so that she refused to even talk about it.

But back to those entities; when one person encounters an alien insect, it's a good chance it's a hallucination. When several people, under controlled experimental conditions, encounter these entities there's a good chance those entities exist somewhere outside our imagination.† Terence McKenna, another DMT evangelist, named these beings "machine elves" or some variation thereof, a term veering close to Lilly's paranoid Solid State Intelligence. Not very comforting precedent here.

Where DMT: The Spirit Molecule fails and where the more noble ancient Mysteries succeeded is that the former offers no moral framework in preparation for the psychonaut, whereas the Mysteries were extremely rigorous in instill positive moral guidance in the initiate. This served to protect the initiate from anxiety and fear, emotions that are often express tickets to a bad trip. 

The Mithraic Mysteries- with their ordeals and tests, were especially demanding in this regard. And we know from their literature that their trips brought them to some pretty wild destinations.

You don't even need to believe in the objective reality of alien space insects for all this to work. You can believe they are just artifacts of the human imagination given form by powerful psychopharmacology. Either way, the same rules apply. 

It's something we're beginning to understand now as we see the pharmacological roots of all of our great spiritual traditions. Meditation, intensive study, acts of charity and other traditional time-tested means help to calm the activity of the adrenal glands and the amygdala, which in turn will make the psychonaut a less tempting target for negative emotions/entities/whatever you wish to call them. 

I have a strong feeling that a lot of young people are going to find all this out the hard way, however. All this "Satan is Sexy" brainwashing we've seen in the media (primarily in pop music) seems to have had some effect, even in the Age of Atheism (an age which is always a mere transition). Of course, no one tells these kids that Satan is the payday loan broker of the Archonic spiritual realm.º 

Every generation needs to learn that for themselves.




* In a previous post I explored how a certain comic artist-slash-channeler-slash-remote viewer seemed to pay unconscious tribute to Parsons and Cameron in a strange story about the Fourth Dimension. In that tale, a haberdasher enters an alien dimension only to return to this one and discover  the love of his life, a woman from Mars. Marjorie Cameron famously claimed to be a Martian. There are other interesting subtextual currents in the story as well that may well merit another post on the story. Jack Kirby wasn't an artist- he was a radio.

† This revelation is why I began to reclassify my own encounter with a malign entity as youth from "hallucination" to something else, in large part to hearing Graham Hancock describe several similar/identical encounters by ayahuasca experiencers. I was familiar with hallucination, even as a child and knew how it worked.  My giant chevron attack experience was more typical of a hallucination- non-linear, indistinct, non-narrative. 

º I'm not kidding about that. Another friend from that 80s circle moved to San Francisco in 1985 and eventually  ended up on Anton LaVey's block of California Street. He said that the house exuded an aura of gloom, not menace. LaVey was voicing disillusionment with his "faith" in the early 70s, according to Jacques Vallee's diaries. If a certifiable genius like LaVey couldn't get the better of Ol' Scratch, you can be certain the numbskulls fiddling around with Satanism today will get taken to the metaphysical cleaners.

68 comments:

  1. Awesome flow of thought Chris, interesting timing also, because I believe I seen a headline the other day that said to the effect, they want to use this DMT and others like it to treat certain mental disorders. I know this stuff is real, I had the misfortune of being in a house with some fools doing stupid stuff with a Qujia board,I left when the craziness started, and I highly doubt they put back in the board what they let out.great work take care

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    1. DMT to treat mental disorders, eh? That's like the old fox guarding the chicken coop routine. Makes you wonder, doesn't it. So many agendas at work out there...

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  2. Nice piece. I doubt any of these entities(?) are "good" or "evil" they feed through the consciousness of the experiencer, in my opinion. They have no relation to our organic life and are under their(?) own agenda if they even have one. I believe that they are either a byproduct of the matrix we live in or a manifestation of the creators(?) of the reality. I believe these whatever they are, are inorganic, maybe machine maybe something else.

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    1. That could be. Either way, I think caution is the best way to approach any contact with them. You don't want to find out the hard way.

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  3. Any decent shamanic practitioner will tell you that when you go journeying into the spirit worlds, whether by the use of psuchedlics or the drum, there are spirits who mean a person good and those who mean a person ill and then there are most of them who don't really give a damn about humans at all, and are busy going about their spirity business. Terence Mckenna said much the same--that not all the spirits he met were nice ones.

    I haven't decided about the BEK myself, either. Some of the stories seem pretty much like vampire lore, others sound like standard FOAF stories/urban legends and then there are the ones that somehow ring true to me. Happily none of the little critters have tried to follow me home, get in my car, get into my house. I'm paranoid enough as it is, I don't need help from such as they.

    Spirits, of course, do feed from our energy, so maybe these are just a new manifestation of energy vampires. Who knows?

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    1. Well, I think the point is that there should be a measure of preparation, which almost seems anathema to the judgement-adverse entheogen crowd. I really think it's time to ditch the 60s baggage and rediscover the ancient Mystery tradition. As I said, everything they were talking about in the DMT movie had already been dealt with the in the ancient Mysteries.

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  4. I ran into those damn insects about the 3rd or 4th time I did acid in college. At the time, I thought they were just a hallucination. Much later, I came to realize they were real (in some sense) and did some subtle damage that took years to fix.

    I'm still in favor of chemical-assisted journeys, but I absolutely believe that one needs an experienced guide.

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    1. Hear, hear. Set and setting and a wise guide are a must. Otherwise the damage is unimaginable. There are a lot of people who think the serial killer outbreak was MK Ultra and in a way they were right- I believe it was an inevitable byproduct of a population mindlessly messing with its collective psyche. It's almost like a Monsters on Mape Street scenario...

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  5. I love reading your blog. It's sooooo good! Remember those short movies when were kids, like Circle of Fear, and such? Well I think that you could make a really good series of stories that deal with real life experiences, the mind, body, and soul, all of it, and maybe even help a few searchers along the way. Because ya, I had some very strange experiences as a youngster. No one told me why Lucifer was thrown out of heaven, but it said so in the Bible, and no one knew anything. I was too curious to put it down....I went searching to find out for my own self. Oh what I have found. Definitely caution is recommended. Thanks for your excellent blog. I'm going to go read some more.

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    1. No I don't remember Circle of Fear and thank you so much for bringing it up! I have a new 70s bonanza to dig into. Wonderful! YouTube is good for something...

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    2. Hey Black Panther: how did you find and why are you following the Isolation Man blog?

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    3. I found it here, and I liked it, that's why.

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    4. I like the light at the end of the tunnel.

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    5. Hey The Horns and the Hawk, is this your blog too?
      http://isolation-man.blogspot.ca/

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    6. I don't know what that second one is, but it's not related to the Isolation Man movie blog.

      Isolation Man was a very local, very indie, very kind of crappy movie I helped work on. It's just weird to see complete strangers following it. Here's a couple trailers: https://vimeo.com/tag:exquisite+vanishteer

      We finished an edit of the movie, but as far as I can tell, it's not available anywhere. Which is probably for the best.

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  6. I'm sure you've seen this, and it's honestly repugnant to the psyche. But it's a drawing by Margorie Cameron.
    http://36.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m1l7z6Jvg31qas9b6o1_500.jpg
    Funny you should bring up all the dark elements of dmt that the doc purposefully left out. I hear all the time from people grazing the surface of the psychedelic movement that dmt is the answer to all our problems. When I point out some of the unpleasant experiences described in the book they just look at me shocked and perplexed. Timothy Leary indeed.

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    1. Since my previous awareness of DMT was largely negative I was really taken aback by the film, especially knowing how equivocal Strassman's own research actually was. Did Joe Rogan actually bother to read any of that literature?

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    2. Repugnance is in the eye of the beholder.

      Actually being from San Francisco, when I look at LaVey's house I see a house. Like the cream and green one I grew up in. For example.

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    3. That's not his house. His house was torn down by the city and a new one was put up, according to my information.

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    4. It appears someone took a photo of it before it was torn down. FYI, Marilyn Manson gives his impression of the interior in his memoir, he described it as kind of a letdown. The house doesn't signify anything special to me, except that it housed a family that my family ran into occasionally. Also, I never read Turn Off Your Mind: The Mystic Sixties and the Dark Side of the Age of Aquarius but wouldn't it be great if someone did an updated variation on that.

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  7. Good article Chris. I appreciate your responsible treatment of the subject, of which I have no personal experience. However, recently I listened to McKenna speaking on synchronicity - not DMT in this case. But he mentioned DMT because of a strange synchronicity he had related to DMT. He said that only two times in his life he had matches spontaneously ignite in his pocket. (?!) Each time was only a few minutes BEFORE "turning someone else on to DMT."

    Kind of makes you wonder, eh ?

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    1. McKenna seemed a little too taken with the sound of his own voice. So much of the things he preached about were irresponsible or improbable to the point of impossibility. I think he was a bard of a lifestyle and a state of mind, but I don't think his ideas had much viability past Esalen's gatehouse.

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    2. I think it's important to have people like that to push at the envelope but the danger is in treating his musings- which were often all over the place- as gospel, as many in the entheogen community do. And he could also be a terrible elitist, which I think is very common among that set.

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    3. A couple of unrelated comments: (1) McKenna reminds me of scientific luminaries I've met who are drunk on their own kool-aid, over-confident and full of hubris. (2) On LSD I've experienced things that "should not have happened" but demonstrably did. I absolutely believe that reality becomes more plastic on hallucinogens; thus they are quite powerful, but also quite dangerous. There is a reason the more plastic realms of reality are more dualistic: the more easily one manifests, the more readily apparent becomes ones true motives, so that ones spiritual alignment becomes more rapidly self-reinforcing. Humans on this plane are confused and self-defeating because we can't do much very quickly, but in other realms it's impossible for such confusion to remain.

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    4. Well said, Andreas. And I can't help but wonder if there are medical consequences with McKenna-level tripping. Constantly rewiring your brain chemistry in such an extreme manner can't be without side effects, can it? Aside from the classic burnout/casualty types?

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  8. I read an article recently about how the brain reacts when it's constant flow of stimulus is interrupted by meditation, numbing drugs and anything that slows the thinking process to near standstill. Supposedly, the brain will then create stimulus based on projections of one's mind, hallucinations, based on, unrealized sometimes, fear and prejudice, etc. rather than desire and more pleasant aspects of mind. Maybe since we are reluctant to explore the darker aspects of our nature, this is nature's way of reminding us we aren't all we hope to be but much more. Periodic silencing of our thoughts may induce our personal gremlins, angels or something more, to make entertainment or simply stimulus.

    Meditation, at least for me, seems to bring about these entities because when I've had enough weirdness, I give up meditation and they disappear. I think the suggestion of the discipline of training from the mystery schools or perhaps eastern religion is probably important too or one might think he's just losing his mind.

    That or the entities are real, but depriving the brain might be the doorway for them to enter.

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    1. Well, the kind of things you get with meditation or even sensory deprivation are nothing compared to these powerful psychedelics. It's just a question of degree. That's the issue where you have to ask what doors are being opened and who is behind them.

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  9. Although an experienced psychonaut. It's been decades since I did anything harder than a mild mushroom journey. Like yourself, I was somewhat stunned by Strassman's 'ethics' surrounding human subjects, and wasn't too surprised when he ceased the experiments. He was probably getting pretty nervous about potential liability. The point is, I noted those results when watching the film, and it has kept me from getting some DMT and taking the journey for cautionary reasons. Your point about the preparation for these experiences being built into the Mystery traditions is well made and terrifically expressed. Thanks for intelligently discussing these subjects. I think your take on McKenna in the comments section is spot-on. While I'm a fan of McKenna, as with all 'gurus' it's best to take away what you need, and leave the rest behind.

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    1. Well said, David. I don't think DMT is the kind of thing that should ever be approached recreationally and I'm afraid that film is going to inspire a lot of people to do so. All that drug jargon got a bit wearying as well, it sounds very culty.

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  10. If Carl Jung were alive I'd guess he'll view the black eyed kids and Slenderman archetypes as symbols of a culture who's dreams have been beaten down by terrorism and bad economics.

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    1. Yes I was wondering that also, which kids do the black eyed children represent to this blog's author,

      It's always interesting to find out which members of a generation are demonized with these types of representations (probably relates to social status / lower classes, etc)

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    2. They don't represent anything to me. I really don't know enough about them to form that kind of opinion about them. And what Carl Jung would view publicly and privately were two separate issues most often. There was most definitely an exoteric and an esoteric Carl Jung.

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    4. I should add that the whole idea of this representing that is something I've come to resist since it very often leads you nowhere. I mean nowhere. That's another aspect of New Age thinking that I've struggled to purge, which is difficult because it still lingers in the culture. Sometimes you have to recognize things for what they are and not impose a narcissistic self-narrative upon them.

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    5. Well, I think it's accurate to say the post associates black eyed children with Satanism. And the post ends "Every generation needs to learn that for themselves" so that seems to tie the whole commentary to Millennials. Is that an inaccurate reading? I was just wondering which Millennials, of what milieu?

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    6. Ah, there's the confusion. That was in reference to DMT, not BEK.

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    7. I gathered that. There's no confusion. The observation is that you conflate several topics in the post.

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  11. Regarding the "Satan is sexy" propaganda our culture is currently buried under, I wonder about the core motives of those who are propagating this: are they just the sort of corporate greedheads who will sell anything or anyone for a buck? Or do they have more ominous goals, like are they truly playing for the Other Team? If so, what does that say about our culture or the future of our "civilization?" Who run Bartertown?
    It's too bad that some of the cruel lessons people learned the hard way back in the 60s and 70s are having to be re-learned by the subsequent generations today. Even though the bullshit espoused by the New Age gurus of those times has been discredited since at least the mid-70s, it is still being repeated today and accepted as gospel by some. Not everyone you meet in this world is your friend, kids, and that holds true for entities you meet in other planes of existence or alternate states of consciousness.
    I have long suspected that the "Nine" were nothing more than lying entities from the astral plane who gave themselves a big buildup and jerked along some unsuspecting novices who were in the mood to take themselves and their projects way more seriously than reality would warrant. If the Strangers you are meeting are fanning your ego, that's a bad sign. But that's just a long-held attitude of healthy paranoia overlaid with a bit of skepticism speaking. Your mileage may vary.

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    1. There's certainly a lot of manipulation going on. Satanism always seems to run the plebes aground so maybe it's all more crowd control. Instilled self-sabotage. Because that's all I've ever seen arise out of that philosophy.

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  12. My fascination with all this stems from my own personal experiences - outside of some strange dreams and seeing something weird in the sky, I have not had an experience that wasn't grounded in 3-dimensional reality...I'm not an athiest, however. Nor do I find that there isn't a strong component of otherworldness, as there often is - well, to explain my position, here's an experience: I've been sick all weeek, very, I rarely get ill - I'd traced getting sick to a personal position, a negative one, that I was taking on - lost my ability to laugh, to sing - gave it up, really - a few nights ago, I broke the fever by something strange and nasty - thought it was the cat's whiskers on my arm saying hello, but it felt different - giant wolf spider on my arm - threw it away, then stomped on it - felt bad - spider scary! Immediately noticed, fever gone, instantly. Well now. Did that spider wilingly sacrifice itself? Or was it just a spider doing it's spidery thing, and my self seized on it and used fear and panic to demonstrate the power of mind? I don't know, and i realized that in my situation, since I don't seem to happily or unhappily waltz around with otherdimensional whatevers with seemingly odd ideas about what to do about this and that, and since I cannot tell/decide betwixt 'is there like, hyperstuff outside us that affects us' and 'are we just all the uh, hyperstuff and maybe a little confused?' ideas that often swirl around the head - or why all these shamanic traditions seem to insist that we aren't, ourselves, infinite beings and must pray to be delicate around other such things (because really- because really, a lord in this existence or another, it's still a completely unnecessary power struggle. One should treat all beings, including oneself, with respect. And is also why I am not surprised to find that said 'others' are virtually identical to us - some good, some bad, some a mix, etc.) I generally opt for working with what I have- that which is around me - or that I currently percieve - and read with interest others rather different experiences. I can only hope that run on sentence paragraph thing has made my position (and hopefully, some small understanding of what has been said) at least somewhat apparent...I apologize for this off the cuff badly written sketch of my current thoughts.

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    1. Sounds like you have some heavy issues to work through. Interesting sync with the Wolf Spider given recent events here on the Sun. You seem to have a positive outlook on your journey- I think you'll work out whatever rises up to challenge you.

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  13. I'm open to psychedelics at some point in the future. In the past I've taken the same plants with hallucinogenic properties that my distant ancestors handled just fine. I've never experienced anything I'd call a bad trip. I have prepared the drug itself wrong, and have experienced the physical effects of having done so. And sure, that contaminates the mind space. There's nothing psychedelic about nausea and vomiting into a toilet. It's also wise to take care of the setting, as in that particular instance I hadn't taken that plant before, and assumed it's mild reputation was equivalent to cannabis.

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    1. Anonymous, no fear here, show yourself.87

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    2. Yes, it's always wise to respect the journey and prepare properly. We did see some unfortunate incidents on the Ayahuasca trail a few years back...

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    3. Dennis, I get the impression CLK doesn't want to associate openly with certain types of people.

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    4. Anonymous, IMHO Mr. Knowles is seeking truth and Gnosis, no fear here. I enjoy his wit and story telling. No fear here. Respectfully, Dennis

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  14. You say the "age of atheism" is always a phase. When has human kind ever been atheists? I can only think of dictators who've mandated some form of atheism, but that seems less like a genuine move and more like blatant legal manipulation whereas many more people now than before are, I think, genuine in their belief that there is no higher power. Whether or not they're right, I just don't know of a time when culture's have naturally adopted it as an expression and not something that's been forced on them on pain of death.

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  15. Atheism has often taken hold in decline periods of nations, much like the precipitous declines the Western countries are all experiencing. The most instructive examples are to be found in the histories of Greece and Rome. The modern myth of a history rife with totalitarian theocracies and then fabulous modern democracy is just a myth.

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  16. Regarding dangerous assumptions of some of the "White Light" Crowd...

    ...when taking a walk in the woods alone at night, one certainly would not naively approach any random animal encountered, or unquestioningly take the worldly advice of some human stranger you happened upon out there.

    The "spiritual woods" should be approached with at least that much level of caution. If not more...

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  17. I fully agree with the caution needed in the deeper psychedelic realms. However, I don't agree with conflating negative experiences and scary insects with Satan, who is a Christian God of Evil. The popular concept of Satan was mostly developed in the dark ages and by Milton, and bears little or no connection to any negative or bad spirits that some may believe they have dealt with in some experience. However, that explanation may have meaning for some, but I believe it reflects a Christian world view, and is in no way universal.

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  18. I'm glad others have noticed the possible high weirdness of psychedelia especially in relation to cultures and traditions, but there's so much discussion going on I don't want to ramble and would like to try to add a viewpoint, so apologies now if it does seem rambled.
    Before anything, SWIM never studied bodhisattvas or individual 'entities' of any sort previous to this. Yet, during the first personal experience with synthesized dmt, SWIM encountered a being that wasn't able to be recognized until months later while looking through mandalas. It took on the exact appearance known to represent buddhist dharmapalas, which looks really similar to depictions of hindu's mahakali/kali. The interesting connection is that in the cosmic serpent, narby connects kali with the aztec xolotl and further the ashaninca maninkari, or the invisible beings that live within ayahuasca. Even further, dmt visionary artists pablo amaringo and luke brown have utilized the same 'character' in their work. The commonalities could obviously be some form of archetypal imagery, as the headspace itself is reminiscent of jung's carnival and chapel perilous but the widespread recognition spanning from south america to asia and the consistency of appearance lends curiosity to the idea of such forms individual existence.
    One such possibility I have played with is that they're remnants of symbolism in our genetic memory from a shared tradition that was used to 'map' the abstract language of the personality, similar to the dreamtime totems of australian aboriginals, reinforced over time by schools of thought and possibly even propagating into some form of 'being' due to the uneducated identification with idolatry and etc which would add premise to the need for 'training' but either way...

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  19. The "Satan is sexy" mention reminded me of a series of short videos Alan Moore recently released in support of his Lovecraft book, Providence. He mentions his disquiet at how "cuddly" modern culture has become with Cthulhu. Variant theme, I suppose, and consistent with the casual treatment of Ouija, etc, rather like letting the kids take the rider mower out for a spin without securing the blades.

    All the drug talk reminds me of my idiotic youth, when as a lad I thought it was cool to listen to Stoners and Seekers talk of their experiments up in the woods of Mount Dagon. I distinctly remember several of them talking about bad trips. They had what is in hindsight an alarming continuity - mutterings about "going too far" and "opening doors". Not much else to report on all that, they were reluctant to give details. I don't think many knew one another so I doubt they were sharing stories, though image contamination is certainly possible.

    Yeah, these black-eyed kids - dunno why, but I immediately thought about the "Air Force" guys who would show up at UFO witness houses in the 50s and 60s. Maybe Parsons did let something in, and maybe these BEKs are the same or similar entities, merely trying on a new disguise? "Let me in" also made me think of walk-ins, or some sinister version of same, looking to get inside the body. Opens a ton of speculation.

    And, a portal to where? There's theories I have read of a "Lower Astral Plane" where human spirits with emotional baggage get stuck, intermingling with "demons" that might be their future form. Rum stuff, I know, good for a made-for-TV movie, but forget the hooey and think of it as a system. Ignore the labels and think of the database, and the intelligence behind it, in more neutral terms. Machine elves, indeed.

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    1. I think one needs to resist the temptation to evaluate paranormal phenomenon purely in terms of apparent 4D manifestation. BEKs, MIBs, BVMs, etc. are all potentially the same species of being.

      Re: "made-for-TV movie", my partner recently found an old/cheap set of Twin Peaks DVDs, and we are now working our way through the series. There are some interesting parallels between the themes in that series and Chris' last few posts, and I wonder what (if anything) this bit of mild synchronicity means in my life. In any case, Twin Peaks talks about the "black lodge" through which all souls must pass, and where some souls get stuck or are destroyed. This is very clearly the lower astral plane, which appears in a sufficient number of metaphysical models that I take it as a given.

      One question I have had up until very recently is the following: if the lower astral plane is supposed to be less vibrationally dense than the physical plane, then why do the worst entities seem to concentrate there? I have recently come upon a model that seems to explain this conundrum, and in general the model makes sense to me. One of its corollaries is that the beings that inhabit the physical plane are more mixed in our apparent intentions because the connection between thought and manifestation is so slow; in the less vibrationally dense realms, thought leads to manifestation more quickly, so that the intentionality of various beings gets sorted out more quickly.

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    2. Awesome. Thanks Andreas. I'm glad someone else is working on it too. Sometimes when I look just past this reality and into fourth, I see really beautiful and loving looking beings. But there's more than that I'm sure. It's just that when a being can be loving, they can command the situation.

      Once I decided to do an experiment after I read it say somewhere to send love into the fourth (lower fourth) dimension. So I took a hollow copper pipe about a foot long, capped on one end and placed a pointed fat quartz crystal on the other end. Then I focused it to that world and I began sending love. But you see, my intentions were not good. I was sending this love out hahhaa, to harm them. They say love destroys the darkness. So what happened was that I heard some voice, a darkish voice screeching at me saying; "I love you Mary, I love you, I love you Mary," very sarcastically. Suddenly I felt a pain in my left shoulder where my arm and shoulder meet. It started then, and throughout the rest of the evening it got worse and worse until it was so bad that night, I was crying in pain. I never had a baby, but I thought that this is probably what the pain of birthing would feel like. I didn't have any aspirin. I sat there on my bed crying holding my arm when a friend called. I asked him to bring some aspirin and alcohol. He did. The pain subsided. It took a few months to work the pain out, through regular exercising. But you see? There is a wisdom to the fourth. They aren't what we thought they are all about. There's always more to the picture than meets our closed mind's eyes. Hahaha. I do love them for that experience. I've since made friends, and I respect them for teaching me that lesson. Clarify intentions in one's own mind first, before setting out.

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  20. Modern geekdom has leeched away all the mystique and menace from the Cthulhu mythos, it's true. As with everything else. Of course there's still so much to talk about HPL, his sham marriage, his strange relationship with a teenaged boy, his links to intel assets, his very dodgy travels to nowhere destinations that you'd almost mistake for shady courier work. But perhaps that's best kept to email circles.

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    1. As for HPL and the 50 shades of WTF you mention - can't help but ask, Doesn't it all sound a bit like James Shelby Downard? Especially his alleged connections to...well, I'm not entirely sure what, but now all that intel and travel make JSD and HPL seem like two different suits form the same tailor.

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    2. Well, I invite you to do the reading and ask yourself why a destitute pulp writer is traveling hither and yon when he claims he has no money to feed himself. I've discussed this in great detail with an expert on HPL via email and we pored over his travel diaries. None of it makes any sense unless you consider that he may have been doing work to supplement his income. You don't even need to get all spooky about it- people do courier work. Maybe he thought it didn't fit into his aristocratic self-image, since it's generally not a very esteemed position. But having spent a great deal of time poring over his biography I saw all kinds of red flags show up, starting with his relationship to known intelligence asset Houdini not to mention E Hoffman Price. Fans tend to take HPL at his word- I most certainly do not.

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    3. I should add that I did a convention a few years back and sat next to an older comic book writer who was well known back in the 60s and 70s. We got to talking and he told me that he couldn't get writing gigs anymore so he was working as- you guessed it- a courier. He did a lot of long distance driving.

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    4. Sure, and I've read your writing on HPL, and I find it all very interesting. That's where I'm going with this - when you hear JSD's story, read his autobiography, it's tempting to dismiss it as fantasy. But then, you get a second guy, another writer, in roughly the same boat (high society and empty coffers) in roughly the same time period, doing similar things, and you have to reassess the situation. It seems a bit odd for coincidence. Makes me wonder why HPL stayed in NYC so long when he hated it so much - couldn't get reassigned?

      As for the courier aspect, sure, who would think twice to see a creative writer or researcher visiting a town to gather data or take in the sights? It's a less-violent version of the Murder She Wrote scenario, the writer always seems to show up...now, ol' Howie never killed anyone (I hope!) but it might be interesting to map out what notable events happened immediately following his visits. If he was intel, was he delivering the goods that initiated an investigation, a raid or some such? An unassuming teetotaler like him strikes me as an early version of Burroughs, the Invisible (business)Man. That's not to say Burroughs was an asset! Merely good at blending in.

      And it always struck me weird that HPL wrote a tale for Houdini. Who introduced them?

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    6. I don't think HPL was intelligence. I think if anything he was just a message boy, a runner, a peon. For who I don't know. Price's CV is certainly fascinating though. As to New York, why would he stay there? So much about about him doesn't add up but his acolytes aren't the types to ask impertinent questions.

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  21. Years ago when I was at a house party in some woods three people from the past faded in and were looking horrified and I wondered why. When I looked around to see what they were looking at it struck me that someone was talking to a clump of grass, someone else was chatting to a tree and so on. I often wonder if they were people getting a glimpse of the future and wondering what became of the world or if I was just tripping.

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    1. It can be so hard to tell the difference sometimes...

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    2. 1993 to be precise and it was a woman with long dark hair and two men.

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  22. I have a great deal of experience with hallucinogens, having taken various types upwards of 100 times in my life (I lost count at some point), entirely during my 20's. Out of all that, I only had 2 truly terrifying experiences (bad trips). It's hard to even recall now what triggered the bad experiences, but I remember the primal fear that was unleashed in me, like nothing I had ever experienced, before or since.

    The main thing for me was that prior to trying those substances, I was pretty much the average American middle class boy. No interest in politics, loved football, loved music, and had no interest in high weirdness. It only took one trip to change all that, and 15 years later I'm still a radically different person than I was before that. The main thing I took away was a sense of the wrongness of our society and culture, the fakeness and how I can't believe people can just motor along their whole life buying into the illusion of America that we were all fed in our school days. I've managed to "fit in" more or less..........decent job, pay my bills, do what I have to to exist in this truly strange society of ours. But since my tripping days, it's never felt right to me, or good. We don't belong here, so to speak.

    However, I've never really encountered a lot of what you discuss in this post, in my past entheogenic experiences. I DO recall feelings of revelation and clarity, but those usually disappeared shortly after a good nights sleep (except for what I detailed above). It is true though, that the bad experiences had as much, if not more, staying power than the good ones. I still remember that fear.

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    1. Gus, my experience echoes yours. I've done hallucinogens only about 5-10 times (in my early 20s). Most of the experiences were profoundly moving and mostly positive. I can't say those experiences alone changed me, since I grew up in a family that had experience with and tolerance of paranormal weirdness, but they certainly reinforced my experience of reality being truly plastic. I also "fit in" at the most superficial level (decent job, comfortable life circumstances) but at a deeper level, I also experience a profound sense of wrongness in the world around me, in the way developed societies are structured, and therefore have trouble relating to most other people at the deepest levels.

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  23. Hey Chris,

    Sorry for the late comment. As you can probably guess, this post speaks to my core interests in a very powerful and lucid way. In my personal opinion there is indeed something to the BEK phenomenon. While such a notion seems almost tailor-made as the stuff of 21st century paranoid internet urban legends, or something culled from a derivative Hollywood horror movie, I do not discount this phenomenon for a second. It just sounds very inter-resonant with stories I've been told about Africa and India, where strange and sinister children would show up as apparent harbingers before a plague or earthquake or massacre. The BEK situation sounds more explicitly vampiric and folkloric, and its obvious resonances with the MIBs can't be ignored either. Black eyes show up again and again in actual folklore, as well as the sci-fi and horror movies that draw from it.

    The problem with all this stuff though is, I think, our inability to see and imagine in multiplicities and nested narratives. Even on a purely psychological level multiple realities are occurring at once. We seem to forget that things can be real and unreal. To put it simply - legends are based on life, and lives are based on legends. We humans wrap ourselves in stories. Indeed it's what we're made of. Chains of ideas, images, thoughts and emotions. We haven't figured out yet that its basically the same for all sentient consciousness, regardless of apparent form.

    So to say that 1) it's all straight up happening as just it appears to be, or 2) it's all just urban legends, hoax, distortion and Gothic Romanticism for an internet age - both extremes are missing the point entirely, I suspect. However we choose to style the possible over-arching meta-narrative to all this interconnected High Weirdness, we should all agree on one thing. There is something deep and ancient and weird and ACTUAL occurring here, and it's intimately connected to our stories, our art and fears and hopes, in ways that usually only synchronicity can give us glimpses of. When we truly understand that, we can then understand that if we try to be reductionist we end up nowhere.

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  24. (Continued...)

    True scepticism, caution and mindfulness are useful tools in sorting wheat from chaff in this regard. When using these tools we begin to see, at the very least, an intricate web of terrifying and tantalising interconnected possibilities. We realise that whatever is actually happening it is beyond the scope of even the best sci-fi or horror fiction to completely render and convey. And yet, stories tell us far more than we realise. When we've come to this understanding it just becomes about learning and being really honest about where your personal biases are, what your shorthands for assessing anomalous data might be. I hope this makes some kind of sense, Chris.

    On a final note, the whole Satan is Sexy thing is to my mind just a way of culling vigour, energy and authenticity. It's what the establishment has always done - leeched and raped the counterculture whilst selling us back it's prettied, fetishized corpse at a profit. It's Paradise Lost written by an internecine corporate hegemony. The corruption in our world and the imbalance in power is so monolithic, so inhuman, that we're being offered Milton's Lucifer as a faux-counterculture hero or avatar who questions a monarchical deity. It's an ingenious way to cull that energy. It's flat and lacklustre and stupid and completely inverted as it's presented to us by the Establishment: "Hey, be an evil corporate pimp/whore/mercenary, just like us! It's subversive! It's fucking hot!!!" But the reason why this inverted bullshit has worked, for a while, is because of the genuinely subversive anti-authoritarian impulses it's playing on, as with Milton's Lucifer.

    I've occasionally been accused of 'making Satan sexy' with my content at Amid Night Suns, but this misconstrues what I'm trying to do. I'm trying to explore and utilize the shadow-self for the purposes of empowerment and Gnosis - not strip-mine and frack and commodify the motherfucker and sell its empty shell back to people at a profit until something horrifying happens. Tyranny is the deliberate removal of nuance, for sure. Don't just ask who's knocking. Try to get a feel, if you can, for how much nuance and subtlety the stranger in question is comfortable with. Not a foolproof method by any means, but an invaluable one.

    Thanks again for everything you do, Christopher.

    Peace

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