Stargates and Solar Temples: The Tides of History


"The truth is wormholes are all around us, only they're too small to see. They occur in nooks and crannies in space and time. Nothing is flat or solid. If you look closely enough at anything you'll find holes and wrinkles in it. It's a basic physical principle, and it even applies to time. Even something as smooth as a pool ball has tiny crevices, wrinkles and voids." - Stephen Hawking

NOTHING MAKES NOTHING

There's been a marked change in my own country in the past 15 years, probably in yours too. It's been reflected in popular culture, which for the most part has grown small, cramped and dyspeptic, even if takes on the illusion of hugeness. The fact that a zombie drama is by far the hottest property in geekdom shows how defeated that culture is, even at the point of its ostensible triumph. But the most interesting story is the ongoing contraction of expectation in science fiction.

Sci-Fi may look healthier than it really is, because of the success of the superhero movies and the dystopian teen dramas. But at the literary level, it's become more marginal and cult-like than ever before, and riven by fringe political conflicts. Those teen dramas aren't signs of rude health either, given that they're about as optimistic as Walking Dead at their core. They sell well but there's defeat lurking in the margins.

Christopher Nolan gave us Interstellar, but even with inflated IMAX ticket prices it was his lowest grossing film since The Prestige. It was a hit, no doubt, it just didn't leave much of an aftertaste. Articles are being written now about how James Cameron's megahit Avatar has had absolutely no effect on the culture at large, probably not surprising given that the film is a pastiche of 80s and 90s influences.

In the 80s or 90s, John Carter would have been a megahit, back when people believed. It was a victim of the zeitgeist alone.

We've all seen the Apollo hoax videos, now we have a new generation of YouTubers not only declaring that the entire space program is a hoax, but that the earth is actually flat (I kid you not). 

And that's the problem with nihilism. The PZ Myers and Richard Dawkins of the world think they can unleash the nihilist virus into the world and expect it to behave like it does in the faculty room, all genteel and inert. Unfortunately, viruses do what the fuck they want to do. We're just at the beginning of the contagion. 

THE DILEMMA

No matter what happens in the world of science and technology, the basic human dilemma seems unchanged. Heaven's Gate were at the cutting edge of technology for their time and it only served to deepen their sense of alienation. It's no mystery why; they were savvy enough to see the kinds of intrusive surveillance technologies that were coming and it convinced them that the world was indeed a prison planet. 

(It's hard to say what the Solar Temple believed in these regards, but their desire to ascend to the Grand Lodge on Sirius seems apparent. Their lineage to Alice Bailey's spiritual ascendance fooferah doesn't negate the possibility that they were all murdered for their vast holdings).

Human beings can't flourish in captivity. I believe this is a reason why birthrates decline in urban areas. Anyone who's kept rodents discovers the horror that arises when you mistakenly keep a male and female together. If we discover that we are in fact trapped on this planet, I believe that will be a very dangerous revelation for our survival as a species.

X-KP

It's why powerful interests are looking for escape routes. The Stargate is certainly one of these, a kind of travel that bypasses the numbing distances of space. (I always refer to the Fermi Paradox as the FAR-mi Paradox. Everything is goddamn far away. All we really have are educated guesses as to what's going on out there.*) 

You can bet that being able to warp timespace to travel hither and yon is the real grailquest of the space program. Maybe that's why there's little attempt made to dissuade people from calling CERN the "Stargate."

The UFO phenomenon is always going to be lurking in the distance since unless you are really married to the whole nuts 'n' bolts thing, you're bound to start thinking about wormholes and other dimensions and all sorts of things of that sort. Given what we know now about the phenomenon-- that the whole package is as old as the hills-- it's hard to imagine aliens popping in and out from Proxima Centauri. 

Or even Mars, for that matter. 

But if there was a technology that was truly magical-- and stop and think hard about the implications of that before quoting that line-- say something along the lines of that Iconian doorway, then it's a whole different story. 

But then again you could go back and read 2001: A Space Odyssey and read about a race that evolved into energy without mass-- just like any number of races on Star Trek-- and then the phenomenon seems less like a phenomenon and more like a type of interface.


Which is why I've been rewatching Star Trek: Deep Space (the) Nine. The Roddenberrys hated it, since it went against every rule they worked up for Next Generation. But it also called the Roddenberrys' bluff. 

You present this warship (the Enterprise) with planet-destroying weaponry? Well, those things don't exist for scientific exploration, they exist for war. So let's have the mother of all wars. You constantly present these god-like aliens? Well, at some point someone is going to worship them, hence the Bajorans and the Prophets. And of course the whole thing is about the Stargate.

The Nine enigma is also at the core of the original Stargate concept, though the producers went pretty far and wide on that with the TV series. NASA's kissyface with Star Trek is a gimme, but the Air Force's involvement with the production of SG-1 still utterly baffles me.

The fact that ISIS is now continuing the work that the highly trained "looters" of the Baghdad museum began leads me to believe that someone is still looking for something. Maybe it's the Stargate, maybe not, but do I need to remind you that the Rockefellers set Zecharia Sitchin up in a corner office at 30 Rock?

The question becomes how will this translate into the culture at large. Alex Proyas (Dark City, Knowing) is working on Gods of Egypt, slated for release next year. A relaunch of Stargate is also in the works. How this all will shake out is hard to say. The geek world is still trapped in nihilist mode. 

But its skeptic and atheist communities are in the midst of civil wars that make the Stalin-Trotsky struggles of the 30s Left seem genteel by comparison so things could change very quickly. Already people are burning out and peeling away.

THE NEW AUGURY

It's getting harder to tell what's really going on in the military and intelligence spheres because even toilet paper bills are now classified under Homeland Security. The glory days of the Freedom of Information Act are long, long gone. It may be a question of parsing the various strands of disinformation and accidental fact to figure out what is going on. It may yet give rise to a new kind of divination.

I recently saw the old "hoaxed alien invasion" thing dredged up, by a guy who I didn't really agree with but at least used to take seriously. It's all based on old data, and I couldn't help but wonder if it was a slow news day in goldbugland. 

Because the fact is that more people are hooked on the possibility of a faked alien invasion now than a real one- far, far, far more people- so I can't help but wonder what the real agenda behind all of that is.

CULT-URE

Groups like the Solar Temple and Heaven's Gate were artifacts of the 60s counterculture and seem unlikely to re-emerge in the narcissist age where everyone is a cult of themselves. But those groups probably seemed impossible in the 1950s- and even the early 1960s- so you can't predict the future by forecasting the present. 

Will new cults emerge? I suppose it depends on what's happening in the culture and society at large. A major crisis could indeed change the entire equation.

However, what you can sure of is that people at the highest levels of power think much differently than those below them, and that is a constant. Call it eccentricity, call it self-indulgence, but the fact is that the strange beliefs of the rich and powerful have always changed the course of human affairs, throughout history. 

How much change we're in for is the question we all must face.





*I'm as skeptical of astrophysics as anyone should be of any science controlled by the military industrial complex (which is to say ALL of them), especially so given the fact that bold statements of fact are made about the vegetation on planets 200 light years away based on what is seen through instruments gazing through vast expanses of distorting radiation and debris of every imaginable variety.

43 comments:

  1. I also have a deep loathing of the overly long stay of the zombie craze and I often see it as an ironic metaphor of the very fans themselves. Seeing brains as a material food and nothing else could reflect a materialist inspired nihilism. I have a friend who reflects this very nihilism, with whom I argue constantly, although brick walls are easier to get through. His view of the world is economic and product based, which is in turn supposed to lead to fulfillment and happiness. He also thinks children and families are something that gets in the way of this "happiness". I might add he has a thirty year old brain injury and the emotional maturity of an 11 year old. Very nice and happy go lucky guy. I've also noticed among teen agers a total lack of historical sense or higher purpose or ideals or even a trace of interest in them and a drive towards distraction and drugs. Suburban hedonism. They wouldn't be able to even understand the meaning of the word nihilism since they have no understanding of what they lack. But this void seeks fulfillment and that's where celebrity culture comes in...the Cult of Me. Darkest before the dawn? I think it can get darker yet. I watched K-Pax last night for the first time in 9 years. Great Movie. It's frightening to think you can get arrested and imprisoned(hospitalized) for being odd and eccentric acting. Alan Watts compared psychiatry to the Spanish Inquisition with materialist foundations

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    1. Nihilism is only good as long as the living is easy. I don't think it would last long given a real downturn. Narcissism and nihilism are just symptoms of our malaise- our lack of purpose or direction. Which is exactly how some want it.

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  2. >The fact that ISIS is now continuing the work that the highly trained "looters" of the Baghdad museum began leads me to believe that someone is still looking for something.

    I am immediately reminded of the destruction by ISIS of the tomb of Jonah - a Prophet, no less, shades of ST:DS(the)9. There's a brutal logic to it in this light. Were I to want an item of vast importance hidden, I would put it in a venerated place where no one would dare disturb it.

    Ah, a quick look on the Google shows they have destroyed the tomb of Daniel as well. Two Prophets. Tombs blown to dust, to hide the evidence and/or cover their tracks.

    http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/183392#.VO4ZdS62ouc

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    1. Makes you wonder. Orthodox Muslims would venerate those shrines. ISIS is some crazy Jem'Hadar kind of killcult. In this particular case the apologists are correct- they're not true Muslims at all. They may have the jihad bit down but nothing else.

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    2. Wahhabi Muslims, of which ISIS is representative, do not venerate shrines. The destruction of the shrines is compatible with their interpretation of Islam, which sees veneration of shrines as equivalent to idolatry.

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    3. Good to know. Thank you for enlightening us on that.

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  3. May I suggest the song "Depressionista" by the band "Every Time I Die". I think it fits the situation quite well.

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  4. I think we're already seeing the cults... let's not forget that by the 2001 (heh) census, the 4th largest religion in Britain was the Jedi. Late capitalism's products include the hyper-real religions that basically take the products and franchises and use them for worship. We'll see much more of this, I suspect.

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    1. Be interesting to see how the Jedi Cult fares following the new movie. I don't think atheism and Britain are really a good fit. They've channeled their religious impulses into other diversions but eventually the dam will break again. Religious arguments used to cause riots in the Victorian Era.

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    2. >I don't think atheism and Britain are really a good fit.

      Might this be due to Britain being an agrarian society at heart, despite its industrial history and the megacity that is London? In my times there I've had many urbanites who still held a longing for the countryside and a sense of almost Hobbit-like love for the soil.

      Atheism has always seemed an urban phenomena to me, while those who live out in the rural areas are far more religious, or at least attuned to the spiritual in some fashion. Is it all those shoes and concrete, disconnecting everyone from Nature? More likely the spirits are still there, but lost in the hustle and bustle of go-getter urban existence, or take unfamiliar forms. Shades of Hellblazer.

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  5. I have a feeling that this series is not ending here, heh. The Cult-re question feels like a step to take in the inquiry, esp re your line: "Groups like ... are artifacts of the 60s counterculture and seem unlikely to re-emerge in the narcissist age where everyone is a cult of themselves." I think there was some online talk a few years back in new age forums about the Maitreya, or coming buddha, needing to be not a single individual but a "great group soul". I will need to find the thread but wouldn’t some priming of an emerging new age group love to take up a mantle like this? Particularly in parts of asia, with its current celebrated but inflated ascendancy and the fact that many westerns people do NOT have a handle on what’s happening *over there*. Check out the design at Dhammakaya - they are doing something...odd. http://www.amusingplanet.com/2014/01/the-magnificent-buddhist-temple-of-wat.html

    The next trope about wormholes/stargates - how much like the one we already have in Chicago? What's left of dissident culture is picked up and disappeared from "the rule of law" (cough, cough), family and friends to re-emerge with lost time and bodily changes. yes, very abduction, yes, very trans-dimensional and yes...very troublesome....

    Excellent stuff, Mr Knowles!

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    1. Are you referring to the Tevatron in Batavia? I'm not too familiar with the work they're doing there. That Buddhist temple is fascinating- I think we talked about it on the old FB group. I hope Philip Klass lived long enough to be annoyed by it!

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    2. Didnt know about the Tevatron! Very interesting. The Homan Square is the the reference http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/feb/24/chicago-police-detain-americans-black-site and so i meant it metaphorically - much like a wormhole in the bill of rights. Phillip Klass....oh maaaan :) He is probably annoyed somewhere beyond here...

      One last note! The stunning Abbey Lee, Set to play Anat in the Gods of Egypt has this to say about her tats: "I've got one on the palm of my hand, a peace sign on my finger, a little owl, and two new ones on the side of my stomach. I had them done in white ink so I can still model - it means they're invisible..."

      so a peace sign (60s counterculture), an Owl, the Egyptian gods, and invisibility (disappearing into a wormhole) again coming through the sync soup of the internets.

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  6. Maybe they are looking for a missing piece of Giza such as a capstone. Or for tablets that give information so it can be reconstructed. You have me wondering if The Rosetta Stone gets an appearance anywhere either in relation to stargates/portals or space travel. I have a hunch it does but can't think of a ref.

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    1. CERN aren't just smashing atoms are they, as they were the last time I looked. Considering Cern is 60years old I'm wondering what it has actually produced over the years. Their website is complicated. Who said - if you can't explain it to a six year old you don't understand it yourself? If they can't do that then do they understand what they are doing? Or is it a secret. They have a lot of people worried that's for sure, which is really thoughtless.

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  7. Hey Chris,

    Truly fascinating thoughts here, man. I assume you've heard of SG-1's episode 'Wormhole X-Treme'? A show-within-a-show conceit whereby somebody connected to the Stargate program sells the idea to a Hollywood television studio. This allows for all sorts of 'comedic' meta hijinks and weird analogues for the characters within SG-1. The Air Force decides to use Wormhole X-Treme as a kind of safety valve to prevent any future leaks of the classified program being taken seriously by researchers. So, is this some kind of bluff-within-a-bluff, or just a bit of self-indulgent jibber jabber; shameless self-promotion akin to hip-hop artists commandeering Illuminati imagery to sell their music? I tend to think it is indeed a piece of self-indulgence from an awfully written and produced show, but maybe that's not all it is. You gotta wonder, with the backing SG-1 had from USAF, if someone between advisor and scriptwriter wasn't guilty at the very least of having a sense of humour. Or what passes for humour in the rarefied air of studio execs. I guess between all the coke and hookers such an idea might seem like a total riot. This show within a show, Wormhole X-Treme, is also curious for the fact that 'treme' means aperture or hole. So this meta-show within SG-1 is really Wormhole X-Hole. So yeah, indulgent. I'm not suggesting here that USAF or some awful inner recess of the Secret State has access to a working stargate of some kind. It might just be a useful rumor, wishful thinking, a kind of DARPA posturing - but what it does seem to imply, as you've suggested, is that the warping of space-time does seem to be at the heart of a very strange grail quest among the richest and most powerful within the military-intelligence elites.

    Peace

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  8. Very interesting. I may have to bite the bullet and watch another episode of that show...

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  9. You know, this series got me researching into possible stargates here in Brazil. One I particularly like is the supposed stargate (well, inner-Earthgate technically) at the Snorer's Sierra, on the same latitude as Brasilia, and in the state of Mato Grosso ("thick woods"), where my grandmother's family is from. The place is famous mostly because that's where Percy Fawcett disappeared looking for the Lost City of Z.

    Anyhoo, so the natives who live in the area are the Xavante people, and their mythology is full of stories of beings from "the skies" - naturally. One of these myths is about a star who came down to Earth in the form of a woman, and who fell in love with a local. She then took him under a palm tree, where they departed for the skies.

    So looking up some stuff about the Xavante, I see a story about a Texan who came down to Brazil, and who has been helping the tribe to fight Big Ag, teaching them how to raise cattle, and so on. The cowboy's name? John Carter.

    In the story, btw, JC is a gold prospector, and Mato Grosso was mostly populated following a gold rush in the 18th century - including the patriarch of my own family here in Brazil, who I believe was a member of the Ordo Christi, the Portuguese offshoot of the Templars.

    Oh, and get this. In the film version (haven't read the book), due to linguistic misunderstandings, Willem Dafoe's character calls John by his state's name, pronouncing it something like "va-ru-gee-nyah" - and Brazil's biggest ET flap (often called "the Brazilian Roswell") took place in a town called Varginha ("var-gee-nyah", roughly).

    Threads that merit pulling, methinks...

    - Bruno

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    1. This is extremely interesting information, Bruno. I'm definitely going to look further into that. Thanks for this.

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  10. Hey you know there are several Giza pyramids said to be missing their capstones and it's believed they were made of gold and the pyramids themselves may have been gold plated. The capstones appear to have been replaced with some rods. I heard on the radio this week that all the gold in the world would actually only fill two olympic sizes swimming pools and that gold is not formed on this planet but it thought to have arrived from space. The result of a bombardment of meteorites more than 200 million years after Earth was formed.

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    1. Excellent point. Gold has always puzzled me- it's given this totem like importance but no one seems to really question why. It's not particularly useful but seems to have some hold over the imagination that defies rational explanation.

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    2. Regardless of the gold bug issue...I wonder if it has more to do with an alchemist ideal of what gold represents? Is it possible that the fascination has more to do with the attempts that mankind has tried in transmutating it? At one point historically, gold represented "perfection". Maybe it is linked in subconsciously to man's desires for that. Sorry if that is a little reaching...it's just that gold has been upheld so long for its object wealth and I wonder if the idea of obtaining it and fighting and dying for it has somehow leaked into the collective psyche and poisoned the well.

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    3. There is always the whole white powder gold thing. That's a whole other story there.

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    4. indeed it is. thanks CLK...i can't say it enough, Secret Sun is on fire. Keep on keeping on with the high n' the strange.

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    5. I've always suspected the importance of gold in antiquity has something to do with electronics. We've evidence of worlds before out own, as Brad Steiger put it, and even the Hellenistic world had more tech than we might give credit - the analog Antikytheria Mechanism shows they had the math and maker skills to create complex devices that would not be out of place in an early Industrial Age environment. That's a few decades short of the telegraph or the radio, not really far to go. We might conjecture that this level of tech was a hard-fought yet incomplete reconstruction of that which existed in a prior civilization, one that knew the electronic properties of gold and so valued it. The meaning of this value might have been lost in whatever calamity occurred - and this doesn't have to be Atlantis, plenty of more mundane reasons - but the sense of value survived, and so it became/resumed its economic place without knowledge of other applications.

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    6. Well, I've always been a bit agog at archaeologists being so offended at the concept of the Egyptians mastering simple electricity. They could build the pyramids on one hand but couldn't build a simple electric lamp on the other? Something is wrong there.

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  12. I've been reading about the The Dogon Tribe and the Nommos, from capstones to 5x5 magic boxes from Mar to Nommos. I need to stop reading your post Chris!

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    1. Oh, you've just begun! Don't forget that Robert Temple claims the Nommo are orbiting one of the gas giants.

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    2. And there are tiny homes in Timbuktu here where little blue men used to live. I have lots to learn. By the way I've noticed the knights T. are openly recruiting in the uk via their website, which is going down a rather dangerous road in my opinion. The claim not to be political but are too from what I've read.

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    3. I have a theory which I feel is worth sharing. It is that the Tellum people discovered anti gravity and are the root of stories regarding floating islands and magic carpets. Having read about Magic Carpets and how they were created using clay, special fibers and ley lines, it was one of the things that entered my head when I read about how it's believed the Tellem people disappeared for unknown reasons and that it is thought by some in Mali today that the Tellem possessed the power of flight. As they were described as small red people I wondered if they could have been mining it. As it turns out there is a lot of red clay there. So what about the fibre used to create a magic carpet/floating island? Well it turns out they made clothing out of the inner fibre of the baobab tree/ The Tree of Life.
      The word Tellem is associated with Telem Tell and Talmai. I maybe completely alone in finding that fascinating, and heck so what if I am, if not then I'm pleased I shared.

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    4. That is all news to me. Very interesting- I'll have to look into that. Funny how language can unlock so many mysteries...

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    5. I'm wondering if the little red Tellem people moved to Ireland and became the celts.

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    6. I think you'll enjoy this one, it came on TV whilst I was reading up on The Dogon Tribe - quite odd.

      https://www.itv.com/itvplayer/super-4/series-1/episode-33-the-prophecy

      The time travel machine in it even looks a bit like a spaceship.

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  13. Hi Chris, going back a little further into the history of these themes in popular culture: thanks to a related post on the Barbecue, I found out about the 1898 science fiction novel "Edison's Conquest of Mars". Have you read it?

    Billed as a sequel to "War of the Worlds", it has Thomas Edison teaming up with Lord Kelvin and the world leaders of 1898 to reverse engineer Martian technology and build a fleet of space battleships to give the Red Planet a good smackdown.

    Amongst other things, it credits the Martians with building the Sphinx and the Pyramids 9000 years ago; explores the mysteries of the Moon including the glowing crater Aristarchus; and sets out the dangers of space travel including meteor strikes and the need for proper space suits. Oh yes, and the space ships resemble the 1897 mystery airship sightings! Worth reading for the illustrations alone, and the description of Queen Victoria's first flight in a spacecraft...

    It was written by the American astronomer and author Garrett P Serviss:
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/19141/19141-h/19141-h.htm

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  14. Christopher, the posts you have been putting up lately are nothing short of holy fk awesome, excellent, excellent work, I am often glad anew that I found The Secret Sun. And here is where I also found Rune Soup, could say all that again. I find very little these days that even comes close.

    With that said, a long overdue apology: I dont know how I missed the comments section when I was new to TSS and read the post from last August regarding HPL's possibly sourcing theosophy for some of his stories. I ended up contacting you via email, unnecessarily crossing a line or two of boundary. Bad move, been meaning to apologize for some time now.

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  15. No apology necessary. I'm glad you're enjoying the blog.

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  16. Well, The ISIS looting has just taken a turn for the weird. Are their latest videos a not so subtle message to one of their clients? "Cash in advance or the winged bull gets it!"

    I am intrigued by the common thread throughout your work Chris - the willingness of those who are free from the concerns of middle class existence to pursue fringe related topics. Strange how it is only acceptable to indulge these interests if you are super rich (or dirt poor).

    If I was one of the well funded individuals keen on star-gates, AAT, disembodied intelligence, etc I could do a lot worse than pay you as a consultant.

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    1. Well, they know how to reach me. But they never seem to call. Hope springs eternal...

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  17. It probably gets boring listening to people praise your blog, but seriously, I do think what you and Gordon at Rune Soup and a few others are doing is potentially the nexus of a new culture -- one that is desperately needed, for reasons you know all too well.

    You're right that these days people seem too cynical and nihilistic to buy into cults, but I seriously think we need some new cults at this point. How about a cult of the Secret Sun? I'd join in a hearbeat! ;)

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  18. I gotta echo the last comment - Love these Stargate posts, and the blog in general!

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  19. Thank you, kind people. Unfortunately I'm a bit too busy to start a cult at the moment. Plus, I'm not sociopathic, which is a major drawback for being a cult leader.

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