From Sidon to Cydonia: David Flynn on Mars



Once upon a time, "occult" didn't mean sorcery or black magic, it referred to a corpus of ancient hidden knowledge whose meaning had been lost to the sands of time. It embodied alchemy, astrology, gematria, numerology and other symbolic sciences.

Rome's one world religion suppressed this knowledge after a bloody series of purges, massacres and book burnings in late antiquity and passed edicts forbidding its study, which lent it the forbidden mystique it still enjoys today.

Today, "occult" is a misnomer. There's no such thing. There is no body of hidden knowledge mouldering away in some basement. What there is is a race of amnesiacs, of bloated narcissists mindlessly thumbing away at their touchscreens. What's hidden is the ability to understand anything but the basest impulses, which is why the work of a David Flynn is needed more than ever today.

I began following David Flynn's work so many years ago I can't remember exactly when anymore. I didn't always agree with his interpretations, but I was always dazzled by his intellect.

In fact, it was Flynn who first got me started doing this kind of work in public (I spent years doing it privately and through email) when I got so frustrated by waiting for him to update his Having Mulder's Baby website that I decided to do it for him. And the rest, as they say, is history.

Flynn was taken from us at the beginning of the year that informed so much of his work. That's life in this Archonic Hell, but in the meantime I hope you'll enjoy this vintage vid, Flynn's first public appearance. It's a tour de force, and I'm sure you'll be struck by his modesty, scholarship and honesty. This stuff troubled him- it challenged his Evangelical worldview and he wasn't afraid to admit that.

The man is gone too soon but the work remains. Dig into this one of a kind body of work-- it will give your own study and research a boost, believe me.

13 comments:

  1. When you posted this video on the facebook page about a week ago, I was really blown away by Flynn's scholarship, and as you say, his honesty about how the information he discovered challenged/altered his own belief system. I've since spent some time on his website, and reviewing some of his other material, and I must concur that we have lost an open-minded, intuitive researcher. I most wish to comment on your ending line. "It will give your own study..." I've been struggling to write about that very thing ever since I saw the video and website. Thank you so much for introducing me to this information. Talk about filling in some gaps, and open up new arenas of inquiry...I'm still vibrating. I think your post honors his memory as well. A+ is my grade!

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  2. Hi Chris

    Not completely off topic, but I've got a Kirby/xfiles synch that i noticed recently, and no one else to share it with. Episode Clyde Bruckman: Clyde is telling the agents a hypothetical story about a TIME MACHINE. As he concludes the story the scene ends. The very first thing we see in the next scene is a GOLD FROG.

    Nice 33 in the new tag...coming out?

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  3. "...because he was a true Poet, and of the Devil's party without knowing it."

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  4. I just found out about David Flynn a couple of days ago, and his research was always known to everyone who follows Myth/AAT/Religion/UFOlogy etc. but never by source. I just ordered his two books today before coming to my daily dose of SecretSun and found a great tribute by You and a great lecture by David.

    What are your personal feelings about the "Rise" theme that is being thrown around everywhere in Movies, TV Series, Video Games, Commercials, Sporting Events. It feels as if it's being shoved down our throats. Is ritualistic in calling something or someone up to Rise. And how do you feel about the upcoming The Dark Knight RISEs movie. You wrote extensively about The Dark Knight and it's symbolism even tying it into the Sirius theme from 2008. Knowing that you are a huge Batman fan I would appreciate your comments regarding TDKR. TDKR seems even more Orwellian and NWO than TDK did. I Appreciate your work and research.

    Daniel Prinsloo, South Africa.

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  5. Not to burst your bubble, T, but my original plan was to replace as many of the letters in the logo (which is the same as the old one, it's just stacked now) with numbers, but no matter how I tried only the 3's worked. I tried 5s for the S's but that just didn't look right. Cool catch on the CB...

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  6. Hey Chris,

    Mars sure is an interestin' planet, what with the constant references in mythology. Also, as an intuitive, my take on Mars is pretty much the same as our Moon - that there's things there that the authorities say aren't there. Beyond that general conviction; hell if I know. I'm gonna have to dig a little deeper into Flynn's work now. My life has been full of stress recently, but your work has kept my spirits up, as ever. Thanks. Also, I'm loving the new masthead! One last thing, if there really is a Secret Space Program, you just know Mars would be a point of interest. Just how red is a red sky?

    Peace

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  7. Hey again, Chris

    I was just re-watching Flynn's lecture, and wanted to say that I think a lot of this kind of 'harder evidence' to do with AAT - megaliths, lost cities, out-of-place artifacts, etc - seem to also have a Keelian component.

    I mean to say, that when you begin to truly consider things like geometry, fractals, plasma entities and the strange power of psyche as being a legitimate part of the whole phenomenon -- then the harder evidence seems to reveal new dimensions.

    I mean, the anomalies on Mars, the mysteries of Egypt and the British Isles, Baalbek, etc, all seem to be stitched together with high-weirdness threads of meaning. The use of quartz, or unrefined quartz, at ancient sites, along with geometric peculiarities, all point to a nexus straight out of a Jack Kirby fever dream -- whereby human/divine consciousness is the linking circuit in some exotic form of ancient, semi-physical Initiate Technology.

    I say this because in my research I've noticed that the more profound a culture's spiritual insight, the thinner the dividing line between their art/spirituality and their technology. The physical in service of a higher, almost imaginal technology.

    It makes sense when you consider that the ancients were probably just as aware, if not more so, of Pre-Cog and all related PSI, Remote Viewing, etc. If the consciousness at the time was interacting with literal, mysterious gods and therefore had to be largely allegorical and parabolic to convey such insights, perhaps their art-tech was too. Just food for thought.

    Peace

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  8. Chris -
    I'm saddened to read about Flynn's passing. I became a fan of his about five years ago. I bought his books and DVDs, and his work made a huge difference in my studies. I also agree with what an impact his humility makes on you. He really makes one rethink how you approach lectures and sharing information. He was a brilliant dude, and I wish I'd met him personally. I'm also happy to know you were a big fan of his, and we are all poorer for his passing. I'm grateful though for his many lectures and his books. ( I presented some of Flynn's material during a lecture to a men's Sunday school class a few years ago. When I finished they sat with mouths open - needless to say I was never invited back AGAIN. I must have done something right! ) May Dave rest in piece and may we all learn as much as we can from him!
    Thanks again
    Thrace

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  9. Completely off topic, but did you see this:

    http://www.forteantimes.com/features/fbi/6421/the_science_delusion.html

    It's an interview with Sheldrake.

    One of my favorite quotes:

    The reliability of another of science’s ‘constants’ is also doubtful: the speed of light may not be as constant as we have been led to believe. “When I investigated this some years ago,” Sheldrake tells me, “I came to realise that although the speed of light is assumed to be constant and precisely known, there is evidence to suggest otherwise. The speed of light is measured regularly, in university laboratories all around the world, and each comes up with slightly different results. The final figure is arrived at by a committee of expert metrologists who average the ‘best’ results and arrive at a consensus. But this is not based on all the results they are supplied with; some are discarded, either because they differ too much from what is expected or because their source is not considered totally reliable.”

    Measurement of the speed of light began in the early 20th century. Initially, there were considerable variations, but by 1927 the experts had agreed on an “entirely satisfactory” speed of 299,796km (186,300 miles) per second. The following year, this mysteriously dropped by around 20km (12 miles) per second. The new speed was recorded all around the world, with the ‘best’ values closely matching. This lower speed remained constant from about 1928 to 1945, then in the late 1940s it went back up again. It was suggested by some scientists that this might indicate cyclical variations in the speed of light.

    “Now we may never know,” Sheldrake laments, “because the problem was eventually solved by locking the speed of light into a closed loop. The metre is now defined by the speed of light – which is defined in metres. So if the speed of light really does vary in the future, the metre will vary with it, and we shall have no way of telling! I took this up,” he goes on, “with some of the experts. I visited one – he actually had a sign on his door saying Chief Metrologist. When I inquired about the 1928 to 1945 variation he muttered, ‘Oh you know about that, do you?’ He admitted it was a little embarrassing that so many respected scientists had made faulty measurements during that period…

    “‘But this is interesting!’ I said. ‘What if there really were variations? Shouldn’t it be investigated?’ He looked at me aghast. ‘Whatever for? The speed of light is a constant!’ The Universal Gravitational Constant also varies,” adds Sheldrake, “but they’re a bit more open about that.”

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  10. "Once upon a time, "occult" didn't mean sorcery or black magic, it referred to a corpus of ancient hidden knowledge whose meaning had been lost to the sands of time. It embodied alchemy, astrology, gematria, numerology and other symbolic sciences."

    If I may; while I agree that "occult" in the sense in which you use it no longer means "hidden knowledge" since so much is now available in print and on the internet, I would like to point out that using the term as a synonym for "black magic" is also a misnomer. There really is no such thing as "black magic" or "white magic". It's just "magic". What matters is the individual's intent while performing "magic", but labeling intent is a very gray area.

    Also, "occult" is "...alchemy, astrology, gematria, numerology and other symbolic sciences."

    I'm disturbed by the regular misuse of the term. I don't wish to be ultra-critical, but do hope to assist with understanding.

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  11. I think there is such a thing as black magick, and it is very important to recognize when someone is attempting to employ you as a component of their ritual. "I didn't know" is becoming a very, very poor excuse in this age of information….

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  12. I would like to respectfully disagree with you that David Flynn's research challenged his Christian worldview (I realized you said "evangelical worldview"). I knew David Flynn. His research into these matters actually bolstered his Christian worldview. He wrote a letter to me once a few years ago and in it he said "On the one hand I completely know in the core of my being that there will always be another wonderful and awe-inspiring discovery of God's power and glory waiting for me. Even though I live forever, they will never run out." That quote ended up etched on his headstone. I think of him often & look forward to seeing him outside of time. You can see both the front and rear of his headstone at this link, which is located at his forum. http://watchermeetup.50.forumer.com/and-let-us-say-amen-t1223058.html

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  13. I would like to respectfully disagree with you that David Flynn's research challenged his Christian worldview (I realized you said "evangelical worldview"). I knew David Flynn. His research into these matters actually bolstered his Christian worldview. He wrote a letter to me once a few years ago and in it he said "On the one hand I completely know in the core of my being that there will always be another wonderful and awe-inspiring discovery of God's power and glory waiting for me. Even though I live forever, they will never run out." That quote ended up etched on his headstone. I think of him often & look forward to seeing him outside of time. You can see both the front and rear of his headstone at this link, which is located at his forum. http://watchermeetup.50.forumer.com/and-let-us-say-amen-t1223058.html

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