The Secret History of St. Patrick's Day, Again


Well, it's that time of year again- the Liberalia. Some of you may know it as St. Patrick's Day, but it was originally sacred to Dionysus (or Liber Pater as he came to be known after the clampdown on the Bacchanalia), as those who've read The Secret History of St. Patrick's Day know. And this brings us back to Osiris, the father (or Pater) of the Egyptian Mystery Trinity. Here's a sneak preview for those who haven't read the article:
In Egyptian mythology, Osiris was killed on the 17th day of Athyr, the third month of the ancient calendar.

3/17 is also the date of a Masonically-created holiday, St. Patrick’s Day. The story has it that the holiday was established by high level Freemason, George Washington, allegedly to reward Irish soldiers in the Continental Army. But “St. Paddy’s” has traditionally been a very minor Saint’s day in Ireland. Considering that the day has become America’s defacto Bacchanal (which takes us back to Osiris) it’s worth noting some of the parallels of this day with Solar mythology.
• Osiris was believed to be the source of barley, which was used for brewing beer in Egypt.

• It’s customary to wear green on St. Patrick’s Day and Osiris was known as the “Green Man”

I also thought I'd take the occasion to post a drawing of the notorious Leprechaun hallucination as I actually remember it (and believe me, there's no way I'll ever forget it), at least before the coins started to rain from the ceiling. I can never capture the utter weirdness- or the crystalline vividness-- of it, but this gives you a much better idea of the fine fellow's appearance (and nasty disposition) than the photo collage I posted all those years ago.

I've been thinking after looking over my test results over at Genebase that maybe the little bugger hitched a ride from the bogs in the rich medium of my family's DNA and decided to manifest himself in consensus "reality" for a couple minutes once my "reality" filters were suitably bypassed.

Or maybe it was something much weirder altogether.

UPDATE: Check out this new interview I did with Examiner.com, explaining the birth of The Secret Sun and much more.

6 comments:

  1. that little dude still scares me, i don't know why but i wonder about the rope belt

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  2. The thing is though Christopher y'll still be told by certain types what you experienced was 'dying mind syndrome' ie you were delirious and your mind cobbled together a chaotic mish-mash which you've come to interpret and reinterpret over time as this fanciful unlikelihood you now want us to buy into.

    But as you and I both know nothing could be further from the truth.

    Not only is the mind NOT dying but it's at its absolute optimum enabling you to see images so startlingly vivid yet phenomenally detailed at times it's like they've been laser etched on to your eyeballs.

    Sickness shock surprise drugs/alcohol 'deviational' sex sleeping/waking being born/dying serve only as bardo points or gaps in our continuity through which we have the opportunity to glimpse alternities so to speak.

    That I suggest's one of the more esoteric dimensions in all these tales of gods and heroes who either 'kill' or indeed're 'killed' (and also in Isis' use of an artificial penis to allow 'Death' himself to rupture her continuity by impregnating her with the new possibility of Horus).

    I'm highly familar with the experience of having one's normal living space somehow intersect with or open out to other realms but there's a detail you don't mention in your leprechaun story I strongly suspect's in your memory somewhere.

    I bet you if you play the whole thing back carefully there were moments during the experience when you seemed to be observing the whole thing from a number of inconceivable angles - possibly at times simultaneously - so on occasions it seemed as if you were observing yourself from above/below behind/in front from the point of view of the leprechaun and even from other parts of the house where you couldn't possibly've seen yourself (yet you did!).

    And they explain away this level of multiple or poly-perspectived super detailed vividness as the product of a dying brain!

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  3. Chris I enjoyed that interview at Examiner, and the two ones you have done so far on the podcast. For what it's worth I think Paul Weston was way too soft and diplomatic on David Icke in that interview (Icke has far fewer redeeming features than say Crowley, and I feel the same way about Crowley as you do). Icke is just loco and not in a good eccentric harmless way neither.

    As far as the podcast goes, you should try for folk like Jose Caravacas and Eric Ouellet who are doing some of the most interesting non-ET ufology work out there (Ouellet's blog appears to be on hiatus, I don't know what's going on there.. Does anybody know?) so their work is naturally pushed to the margins. They are in the wilderness. In my mind, Ouellet is doing some of the most important work here, just check out his 'parasociology' blog, to those of your readers who don't know it. Mind-blowing stuff, scholarly and thorough, touches on so many taboos. Hence the run-of-the-mill ufology folk go Eric who?

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  4. In your previous post you said -
    'When I was a kid I would get respiratory infections all of the time. As a result I would get terrifyingly high fevers, often peaking at 106ºF. As a result of that, I would often hallucinate.'

    That sounds like toxic poisoning.

    Something you've covered before is how LSD and alcohol can cause the mind to enter other worlds. Well toxic poisoning does the same thing, potentially in a less obscure manor. Plus toxic poisoning is said to have more of an impact on kids.

    If you go onto my blog about cancer (which now covers more than just cancer) and type 'hallucinations' into the search engine at the bottom of the page it brings up some info on potential causes - all being toxic poisoning.

    http://cindyscanceraid.blogspot.co.uk

    Things are more regulated today compared to when we were kids which means we were possible more exposed.

    I've had fevers & completely unexpected hallucinations, some of which have proved to be really symbolic of what the future holds. So I know from personal experiences that they are not the result of a dying mind but in fact something truly complex and at times initially unfathomable. Accessing these planes by means of intoxication is hardly ideal though is it, as it leaves the door wide open for bizarre and sometime quite shocking or disturbing experiences...in my opinion of course.
    If you had accessed these planes via other means such as sleep or meditation then it's just possible that leprechaun might have been really rather calm and pleasant, more like in your earlier impression.

    I love the artwork by the way.

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  5. Guys,

    Since so many people are interested in the topic- like you guys here- I want to clarify a few things. As I wrote in the original post the only reason I wrote about i the first place was because Graham Hancock had talked about similar encounters in his talk at the Chapel of Sacred Mirrors and told me that my experience was essentially identical. But as someone who has a lot of experience with hallucination- and did even when I was fairly young, this was nothing like any other hallucination I had.

    It was nothing like it all. Not even close.

    There were no trails, no morphing, no fuzziness, no random kind of weirdness at the edges. I call it a hallucination because of the setting and because I have no evidence it was anything else, but it was the strangest experience of my life.

    The thing I tried to convey in the original post was how crystal clear it was, how loud it was, how bright it was, how I can still feel its weight, its presence. I tried to convey the weird hollow eyes of the figure but I can't convey his weird, almost puppetlike movements or the lilt of his voice, which I can still hear. The only other hallucination I remember from that period was the giant chevrons (another anomalous high weirdness connection) and that was very much a classic fever dream hallucination.

    I know Nick Redfern wrote recently about Joseph Smith and hypnogogic states and people have written about sleep paralysis but as someone who experienced the range of brainstorms in my youth I can only tell you how lacking and weak those kinds of explanations are. if anything they're descriptions of symptoms and not causes. I wasn't asleep- I was awake. I've had vivid dreams and I know the difference.

    What was it? It's a Mystery, capital M. The same thing with that weird sighting a couple summers ago I wrote about here. The same one my dog saw too.

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  6. Obviously, the Leprechaun was furious with you! You'd followed his rainbow and the coins of his treasure were literally raining down upon you. You found the pot o' gold!

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