ST:TOS AAT



Some fascinating dialogue in this episode, which aired more than a year before Chariots of the Gods. Click here and here for deep background.

21 comments:

  1. Thanks for the links to your previous Star Trek postings. Reading the one about The Next Generation actually reminded me of an arcane potential connection between that show and Richard Strauss. Nothing to do with Zarathustra and/or Salome specifically, but intriguing if one keeps those compositions in mind.

    On the day Hitler committed suicide, the elderly Strauss encountered U.S. soldiers seeking to commandeer his villa. By various strokes of good luck, he was allowed to remain there. One of the soldiers Strauss subsequently met was an oboist who admired Strauss’ work. He asked Strauss if he would consider composing a piece for oboe. The composer initially demurred, but subsequently wrote an oboe concerto dedicated to the soldier (though Strauss forgot his name and affiliation).

    The oboist’s name should sound familiar to Trekkers. His son appeared in a few episodes.

    Jason

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  2. Jason, awesome as ever. Amazing story!

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  3. I've kept this connection close to my chest for a few months. Well, that, and a recording of Strauss' setting of Enoch Arden to music, with Patrick Stewart as narrator. As usual, just waiting for an appropriate opening.

    I've commented so often on sychromystical connections related to Strauss (via Zarathustra and Salome) that I'm considering writing something comprehensive on that. It might shape into an extended entry on a blog of my own (with reference to The Secret Sun, of course).

    There is much more to Strauss' work than just the opening of Zarathustra. He was looked upon as a "bad boy" from about 1890-1910, pushing tonality to its limits and glorifying anti-establishment characters in his tone poems and operas. His music went out of style due to the chest beating of self-proclaimed avant-gardists, but it has come back into vogue in recent years. Furthermore, many of the best film composers draw upon his techniques and tricks, such as dense and vivacious orchestration. And, yes, that includes scores for science fiction movies. If you're unfamiliar with Strauss, think of something like Star Wars, but even better.

    For anyone wanting to know more about the man behind the music used in 2001, I highly recommend an article written by Alex Ross (not the comic book artist). It is not a dry, chronological account; more of a portrait of Strauss that hits upon his sometimes contradictory personality. A perusal of films containing his work might also be worth examining. Naturally, Zarathustra appears so many times as to seem meaningless.

    Jason

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  4. This episode has the creepiest rape scene. It is really disturbing.

    There is a woman character from the Enterprise, and she is needy and submissive, with a sort of heavy-handed fetish for the gods. There is the most blatant erection metaphor when the god gets angry, grows enormous and then...

    The next sequence we see the poor woman, post-rape, wearing a torn toga.

    If this were in the modern BATTLESTAR GALACTICA they wouldn't have needed to couch the metaphors, they would have just shown a blatant rape sequence. But the symbolic imagery is SO much more unsettling

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  5. How's this for a synchronicity:

    http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/04/14/space.hand/index.html

    I think we're getting close...

    Later,

    Jax

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  7. Funny sync, I also thought of this Star Trek episode when I saw the "Dying Star Hand" and posted them on my blog a couple of days ago.

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  8. Yeah, the photo of the event from 1700 years ago! Funny how these things sync up.

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  9. Okay. This is too much. Notice the date the original Star Trek series first aired, and the date Strauss died.

    Now count the number of years between them.

    Also found this intriguing poem, wherein Spock stands in for Jochanaan.

    Jason

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  10. Ha! I didn't realize he died so late.

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  11. http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/2009/04/14/2009-04-14_obamas_introduce_bo_their_new_dog_hes_got_star_quality.html

    What the hell?

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  12. Amazing catch, Angel. I put that up on the Satellite.

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  13. Thinking in broad historical terms, Strauss lived quite a long time. He was born before Bismarck transformed Germany into a nation-state, and he died around the time it was split by the Cold War. The Atomic Age had begun, with space exploration and Rock 'n' Roll coming just a decade later.

    Too bad he didn't live just another couple of decades (despite his already long lifespan), but it would have been interesting to know what he would have thought of Kubrick using the opening of Zarathustra in 2001. Probably curmudgeonly, yet wry, bemusement.

    Despite my various comments about Strauss and synchromysticism, I have found nothing about him having affiliations with secret societies, or dabbling with mysticism; not even innuendo or rumor, which can easily be found about many other people. By all accounts, he didn't believe in a higher power, either. For what it's worth, Strauss did spend time in Egypt to recover from an illness (this was just a few years before composing Zarathustra), and he had a strong affinity for ancient Greece (in fact, he drew upon Greek myth and tragedy for quite a few of his operas).

    Is it possible that he was simply "tuned in" at a level even he was unaware of? With this, as well as hipper-than-thou types looking down on Strauss, there seem to be some interesting parallels with what I've learned on here about Jack Kirby.

    Jason

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  14. Further away from Trek, but closer to the mid-1940s timeframe of the elderly Strauss (albeit an ocean and practially an entire continent away from Germany), I saw an intriguing painting at the North Carolina Museum of Art a few weeks ago. (We went there to celebrate my wife's birthday.) It is a Georgie O'Keefe painting entitled Cebolla Church, which she painted in 1945. Read the description, and then the brief closing paragraph.

    Indeed, I myself wondered "what is that in the window?" The author of this blog posting has tried finding out, and has gotten no answer. One commenter said it looked like an alien from Star Wars (Hammerhead, I'm assuming). Of course, I couldn't help connecting the enigmatic nature of the "thing" with the location and time period (New Mexico, mid-1940s). Perhaps Ms. O'Keefe was tuned in to something?

    Jason

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  15. All the great ones are tuned in, J- you can be one without the other. And being tuned in makes weird shit happen. And just by the 2001 connection Strauss is plugged into a whole ton of weirdness forever.

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  16. The lack of belief and the lack of secret society affilition make Strauss' connections to high weirdness even stranger. 2001 was the gateway hiding in plain sight, but your John the Baptist in Space posting from a year ago was the turning point for me; more specifically, it was your observation about an image of Bowman:

    Note how the seal of his spacesuit creates the image of a head on a platter.After 20 years of being a Strauss fan, and with my interest in science fiction and "the unexplained," that really hit home. The stories of Zarathustra and Salome no longer seemed like mere muses for Strauss' imagination.

    Meanwhile, from X-Files territory...Jason

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  17. And speaking of tuned in...

    Jason

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  18. Christopher-thanks so very much for your post that you referenced for the Rodenberry information -June 16 2008 -absolutely fascinating! I saved that one to my favorites-I had no idea any of this took place -I was never a "Trekkie" but have always noticed Star Trek has a hold -maybe a "mystical" hold over a large population-best to you as always!!

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  19. I had forgotten about that episode of ST. Really cool, especially about the sync with Mercury's Garden and other posts around the synchrosphere, with the hand reaching for the galaxy I have seen all over. You guys continue to amaze me with these things, LOL. Really neat stuff.

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  20. The capital accumulation in america is sufficiently high that the cleanliness of the environment is worth more to the citizens of any state than the meager value of the natural resources that could be extracted while polluting it. Our wealth is derived from the production of higher order goods and services, not natural resources.

    America is not china. There would be little benefit in what you're proposing would occur, and no reason to think anyone living in those areas would want it to.

    Can you defend why the people living in those areas would be willing to allow the environment to be reduced into a 'moonscape'? This is transparent scaremongering.

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  21. You've replied to the wrong post, but don't you remember "drill, baby, drill?" It's become de rigeur for right wing populists to complain about environmental controls on resource exploitation. Watch Fox News for a day or two.

    On top of that I was extrapolating a science fiction scenario out of present trends, so I fail to see how it qualifies as "scare-mongering."

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